Peter Charles McLean (1805-1872)

Peter Charles McLean was born 28 Apr 18051 in Columbia County, New York.2 It is not yet positively known who his parents are, but I believe he might be the son of Peter and Mary McLean. More research in this area is required. His daughter-in-law Susan Winn (Frith) McLean referred to him in depositions as Charles, indicating that was his preferred name.

Circa 1929, he married Margaret Swasey who was born about 16 Jun 1806 in Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts. She was the daughter of Samuel Swasey and Sarah (Sally) Leigh. Peter Charles (with a female of the appropriate age to be Margaret) was found on the 1830 census in Ward 7 of New York City,3 but I have been unable to locate him in 1840. Peter C. relocated to Williamsburg in 1842, and thereafter he and his family are found on the 1850, 1860, and 1870 federal census records as well as the 1855 New York State Census.4,5,6,7

Margaret passed away 11 Sep 1854 in Williamsburg and was probably interred in Union Cemetery. Her death notice appeared in the New York Daily Times.

“At Williamsburg, L.I., on Monday, Sept.11, MARGARET, wife of P.C. McLean, in the 49th year of her age.”8

Peter Charles was a house, sign, and fresco painter. Several of his sons followed him into that trade and either worked with him or opened their own businesses. The city directories for Brooklyn between 1860 and 1870 list both he and his sons with paint and wallpaper businesses located on Grand Avenue. He never remarried.

Peter Charles was nothing less than a stand-up guy. When his desperately ill son Peter B. came home from the war in early 1862, he moved in with his father. For almost three years, Peter Charles took care of his son and supported Peter B.’s family as he recovered. In about 1869, Peter Charles suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed and unable to care for himself. Peter B. took in his father and Peter Charles remained with his son until his death on 27 Feb 1872.

He was interred on 29 Feb 1872 in Union Cemetery.9 I have not yet found an obituary.

He and Margaret had five known children who will be discussed in the next post.
1. Charles E. McLean
2. Peter Byron McLean – previously discussed.
3. Washington McLean
4. Nathaniel Bruce McLean
5. Sarah Amelia McLean

*note – Union Cemetery was closed and the bodies relocated. I will cover this in a separate post.



1. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 1916 (27 Feb 1872), Peter Charles McLean; FHL microfilm 1,324,745. Cit. Date: 2 Aug 2010.
2. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn Ward 14, Kings, New York, p. E.D. 2, dwelling 832, line 6, P.C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 10 May 2014). Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
3. 1830 U.S. census, New York Ward 7, New York, New York, p. 79, line 22, McLean, Peter C.; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 10 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M19, roll 97. Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
4. 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Williamsburg, Kings, New York, p. 469B, dwelling 1508, family 2100, Peter McLean; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 10 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll M432 522. Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
5. 1860 U.S. census, population schedule, Williamsburg, Brooklyn Ward 13 Dist 1, Kings, New York, p. 653, dwelling 55, family 89, Peter C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 10 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll M653 772. Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
6. 1870 U.S. census, population schedule, Williamsburg, Ward 14 Brooklyn, Kings, New York, p. 180A, dwelling 281, family 582, Peter McLean; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 10 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll M593 955. Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
7. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn Ward 14, Kings, New York, p. E.D. 2, dwelling 832, line 6, P.C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 10 May 2014). Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
8. Newspapers, New York Daily Times, 28 Sep 1854. Cit. Date: 2 May 2014.
9. Kings County, New York, death certificate no. 1916 (27 Feb 1872), Peter Charles McLean; FHL microfilm 1,324,745. Cit. Date: 2 Aug 2010.

Peter B. McLean, 1st Lt, Co H, 87th NY Inf – 4

The Civil War & its cost –
Part 4 – Peter B.’s Bitter End 1890-1895

By the end of 1890, Peter B. McLean was crippled by rheumatism and still struggling with the malarial fevers that had plagued him throughout his post war years. His pension made it possible for him to turn his business over to his sons, and I like to believe that life became a little easier for a short time. However, it appears that any relief and peace may have been short-lived.

Sister-in-law Ruth Reed stated, “Mr. McLean was totally disabled from labor last 5 years of his life. … I noticed evidence of insanity a year or two before he was sent to the Asylum. He used to think his children were all in hell and he was trying to get them out. He talked at random. I knew of no cause for this. He had no financial or family trouble or religious trouble to my knowledge. For 5 or so years before he died he used to say that his head bothered him and that he couldn’t sleep nights.”

According to his wife Susan, Peter B. came down with a case of “la grippe” in January 1893. Grippe was a common name in its time for influenza. She stated in her deposition that this bout of illness “left him very weak and nervous. Could not sleep and as a result his mind gave way… Every time he was sick it would seem to affect his head.”

From Daniel Harrison’s deposition: “For several years prior to his death, he lost so much sleep from pain that his mind became affected and a commission was appointed to inquire into his sanity.”

In June of 1893, a panel of doctors was assembled to examine Peter B., and they recommended his commitment to the asylum at Middletown, New York. The records of his examination are not part of his pension file as they were medical records that went to the hospital with him. He was committed to The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital on 1 Jul 1893.
middletown2

Peter B. remained in the asylum for the rest of his life and died there 1 Oct 1895. His death certificate stated the primary cause was chronic melancholia and the secondary cause a pulmonary hemorrhage.

Only after his death is the reality of his final years brought to light. When his wife applied for a widow’s pension shortly after his death, the hospital was contacted for a statement about his death. The pension board was attempting to determine if his death was related to his military service. The following letter dated 4 Feb 1896 was received:

“Sir:-
Your communication under date of Jan. 31, 1896 regarding the late Peter B. McLean, has been received, and in reply I would state:
On admission to this hospital he was in a feeble physical condition, rapidly losing flesh; weighed on admission 144 lbs. and a month later 109 lbs.; was very restless, suspicious, careless in his habits, destructive and inclined to suicide, having the delusion that he was being persecuted by the devil, did not care to talk, would admit of no pain but manner very nervous. The remote cause of his sickness were supposed to be predisposition (nervous), and exciting physical disease. The physical disease referred to, was an attack of grip he had had in January 1892. In his history it was stated that “he was ill with typhoid fever in the army in 1862. After convalescence his mind was not right for six months.” It is probable that phthisis was developed before admission to this hospital.
Very truly yours,
C. Spencer Kinney”

According to my Merriam-Webster, phthsis is a wasting or consumptive condition such as pulmonary tuberculosis. This explains the secondary cause of death.

It was a painful and ugly ending for a good man.

Peter Byron McLean (1832-1895)

Peter Byron McLean was born 21 Jul 1832 in New York City, New York,1 the second known child of Peter Charles McLean (1805-1872) and Margaret Swasey (abt 1806-1854). He relocated to Williamsburg in Brooklyn with his parents in about 1842. He was enumerated there with his father and siblings in 1850 and then again on the June 1855 New York State Census.2,3 In researching Peter Byron, I refer to him as Peter B. to distinguish him from his father Peter C. While I have many documents for Peter B., I have not yet located a photo of him. His physical description from his pension file states he was 5’8″, 145 lbs., light complexion, brown hair, and blue eyes.

Peter B. married Susan Winn Frith on 27 Aug 1856, at St. Mark’s Protestant Episcopal Church, in Williamsburg.4 Susan (24 Jun 1839-21 May 1915) was the daughter of William Frith (1807-1855) and Frances Brown (1815-1854).

Marriage Certificate provided in 1895 by Susan as proof of marriage.

Marriage Certificate provided in 1895 by Susan as proof of marriage.


Like his father and brothers, Peter B. was a house, sign, and fresco painter as well as a stainer and grainer. A grainer was a painter who could stain and change the colors of wood with both paints and varnishes. He worked first with his father and then opened his own business.

On 5 Oct 1861, Peter B. joined the Union Army. On 1 November he was commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant in Company H, 87th New York Infantry Regiment. He was mustered out on 4 May 1862 after contracting typhoid fever and malaria during the Siege of Yorktown in early 1862.5 A separate series of posts about Peter B.’s civil war service and information from his pension file will follow this post.

After his return from the Civil War, Peter B. and his family were dependent on his father’s assistance until he was able to resume his career as a painter almost three years later. By 1870, Peter B. had his business at 156 Grand in Williamsburg, near the businesses of his father and his brother Washington.6

After the death of his father in 1872, Peter B. relocated his family to Roslyn in Queens County. He filed for his Civil War Invalid pension and was granted disability on 29 Jan 1890, although he continued to operate his business until 1893.7
Peter Adv Card

Upon suffering a mental breakdown, he was committed to the insane asylum at the State Homeopathic Hospital at Middletown on 1 Jul 1893.8
middletown2
He died 1 Oct 1915 at Middletown, Orange, New York.9 A copy of his death certificate was found in his Civil War pension file and states his cause of death as chronic melancholia consecutive with pulmonary hemorrhage. He was buried in Roslyn Cemetery.

Died. Peter B. McLean, an old resident of Roslyn, died in Middletown, N.Y., last Tuesday, age 61 years. He was a war veteran, having served in the Eighty-seventh New York volunteers. He was a member of Mansfield post G.A.R. of Brooklyn. Funeral services were held in the Methodist Episcopal Church of Roslyn and the interment was in Roslyn cemetery. Elijah Ward post G.A.R. furnished the pall bearers, and the members of the Roslyn Benevolent society, of which the deceased was a member, also attended in a body and performed the last burial services at the grave.10

Peter B. McLean

Susan survived her husband by ten years and will be discussed in a separate post. According to her widow’s pension file, she and Peter B. had twelve children together. Eight are known by name, one burial for a stillborn has been found, but the other three have not yet been located. It is possible they were interred in Union Cemetery in Brooklyn. There are no extant records for this cemetery.

1. Franklin Byron McLean, born 6 Nov 1857, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, died 10 Oct 1925, Hempstead, Nassau, New York, buried 19 Oct 1925, Greenfield Cemetery in Uniondale. On 26 Sep 1887, he married Martha (Mattie) Elizabeth Wetterau, born Jan 1867, died 28 Nov 1949. They had three children: Emma McLean, Francis Byron McLean, and Jennette (Jane) McLean. All but Francis Byron are interred together in Greenfield Cemetery. Francis Byron is in the Cemetery of the Holy Rood.
2. Washington McLean, born Feb 1859 and died 24 Feb 1861 of convulsions in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He was interred in Union Cemetery.
3. Sarah R. McLean, born 28 Mar 1861 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, died 21 May 1948 in Floral Park, Nassau, New York, buried Roslyn Cemetery. In about 1883, she married Wallace Thurston, born Oct 1863, died 9 Dec 1941. They had five known children: Wallace Bruce Thurston, Edward McLean Thurston, Henry Thurston, Albert McLean Thurston, and Byron McLean Thurston. All are interred in Roslyn Cemetery.
4. Charles Wallace McLean, born 30 Dec 1863, died from diphtheria 24 Jun 1867 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He was interred in Union Cemetery.
5. Peter McLean, born 1865 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He is not found on the 1880 Census or in any documents after 1870.
6. George Edward McLean – previously discussed.
7. Matthew Taylor McLean, born 7 Sep 1869 and died 21 Jul 1871 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He was interred in Union Cemetery.
8. Unknown McLean, born circa 1872, died before 1878, probably interred in Union Cemetery. Probable stillborn as no death certificate on file.
9. Unknown McLean, born circa 1874, died before 1878, probably interred in Union Cemetery. Probable stillborn as no death certificate on file.
10. Stillborn McLean, born circa 1876, probably interred in Union Cemetery. Probable stillborn as no death certificate on file.
11. Stillborn McLean, born and died 1878, interred Roslyn Cemetery. This is the unnamed McLean baby interred in the family plot when it was purchased in 1878.
12. Virginia Stuart McLean, born 17 May 1881 and died 10 May 1896 of malaria in Roslyn, Queens, New York. She was interred in Roslyn Cemetery.



1. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Application #751962; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
2. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Application #751962; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
3. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn Ward 14, Kings, New York, p. E.D. 2, dwelling 832, line 6, P.C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 10 May 2014). Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
4. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn Ward 14, Kings, New York, p. E.D. 2, dwelling 832, line 6, P.C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 10 May 2014). Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
5. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Civil ar and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
6. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Civil ar and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
7. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Application #751962; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
8. Declaration For A Widow’s Pension filed by Susan W. McLean 1905; Application #622894; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
9. New York death certificate (1915), Peter B. McLean, died 1 Oct 1895, Middletown, Orange, New York, Melancholia Chronic, Pulmonary hemorhage. Cit. Date: 11 May 2014.
10. “Obituary – Peter B. McLean,” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 5 Oct 1895, p. 7 c.6; digital images. Cit. Date: 27 Apr 2014.

George Edward McLean (1867-1915)

GeorgeGeorge Edward McLean was born 10 Sep 1867, in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings County, New York,1 the fourth known child of Peter Byron McLean (1832-1895) and Susan Winn Frith (1839-1915). His Brooklyn birth certificate states he was born at home, 428 Grand Street, Brooklyn, and provides both his parents full names as shown below.
1867 Birth
On 12 Jul 1893, twenty-six-year-old George married his eighteen-year-old, first cousin Henrietta “Nettie” Ella Frith (1875-1963) in Brooklyn.2 Nettie was the daughter of George Richard Frith and Henrietta Brimlow. Her cousin Cordelia Edith (Frith) and husband Norman Roscoe were the witnesses.
Marriage
For some reason, George and Nettie kept the marriage secret from his family for almost two months. When the marriage did come to light, it made the 18 Sep 1893 edition of the New York Times.3

Became Jealous and Claimed Her Husband. ROSLYN, L.I., Sept. 17. – George E. McLean of this village married his cousin, Miss Nettie Frith of Brooklyn, July 12. The ceremony was performed in Brooklyn by the Rev. A. J. Wright. The couple kept the marriage a secret, and there is no telling when it would have leaked out had not McLean caused his bride to become jealous of his attentions to other girls. She yesterday told her husband’s parents of the marriage. The announcement caused considerable surprise.The bride’s father is a brother of Mrs. McLean senior, and is well known in the Eastern District of Brooklyn, where he lives. The young people have been forgiven.

My cousins and I have spent a great deal of time wondering what it is about this thin, long-necked, big-eared man that was so captivating.

l-r: Margaret , Nettie holding Welling, Sue, George with Edward, and Ada.  c.1909 Roslyn Height, NY.

l-r: Margaret , Nettie holding Welling, Sue, George with Edward, and Ada. c.1909 Roslyn Height, NY.


George was a painter and general contractor by trade. There are several notices in the newspapers of his receiving contracts for painting and building in the Roslyn area. The family can be found there on the 1900 and 1910 Federal Censuses.4,5 However, I have not been able to locate them on 1905 New York State Census yet.

He died 25 Mar 1915 at the age of 47 and was buried in the Roslyn Cemetery.6 He died of chronic parenchymatous nepritis – bad kidneys. His widow Nettie is the one who changed the spelling on this line to MacLean after his death.
HPIM0739

I will discuss Nettie and their children in more detail in a separate post. Their known children were:

1. Stillborn Boy McLean, 19 May 1894, buried in Roslyn Cemetery.
2. Susan Wynn McLean, born 20 Mar 1897, No. Hempstead, Queens, New York, died 15 Sep 1993, Campbell, Santa Clara, California. Married 1st about 1916 – John T. Kelley (18 Jul 1888-29 Oct 1918). Children: Nettie E. Kelley and John Stewart Kelley. Married 2nd about 1922 – Edmund Griffin (6 May 1894-7 Apr 1977). Children: Edmund Griffin Jr. and Benjamin Payne Griffin.
3. Margaret Frith McLean – previously discussed.
4. Ada Mae McLean, born 25 Aug 1901, No. Hempstead, Nassau, New York, died 30 Dec 1982, Long Branch, Monmouth, New Jersey. Married 1st about 1919 – John (Jack) Stillwell (10 Aug 1897-aft 1951), children: Dawn Stillwell and John Wesley Stillwell. Married 2nd – Henry Sykulski (10 Feb 1913-Dec 1982). They had no children.
5. Edward Frith MacLean, born 29 Aug 1906, No. Hempstead, Nassau, New York, died 29 Feb 1988, Mineola, Nassau, New York, buried All Saints Cemetery, Great Neck, Nassau, New York. Married Dorothy Coleman 26 Apr 1947 in Roslyn, Nassau, New York. Children: Laurie E. MacLean and Leslie MacLean.
6. Welling Seeley MacLean, born 1908 in No. Hempstead, Nassau, New York, died 25 Oct 1964, Caldwell, Essex, New Jersey, buried Roslyn Cemetery. Married Mabel Ramee 2 Sep 1935 in Garden City, Nassau, New York. Children: Nancy Ruth MacLean (16 Jun 1939-23 Jul 1945). Family sources have stated there was a stillborn child early in the marriage and that Nancy was adopted.



1. Kings, New York, (FHL microfilm, Salt Lake City, UT), birth certificate no. 3453 (10 Sep 1867), George Edward McLean; FHL microfilm 1,324,344. Cit. Date: 2 Aug 2010.
2. Marriage Record, Certificate of Marriage Brooklyn #3969, 12 Sep 1893, George Edward McLean and Nettie Ella Frith, witnesses: Norman and Cordelia Edith Roscoe. FHL Film #1,523,044. Cit. Date: 26 Apr 2014.
3. “Became Jealous and Claimed Her Husband,” The New York Times, 18 Sep 1893, online archives (http://nytimes.com : accessed 20 Dec 2008), p. 5. Cit. Date: 21 Dec 2008.
4. 1900 U.S. census, population schedule, No. Hempstead, Nassau, New York, enumeration district (ED) 711, p. 4B, dwelling 77, family 82, McLean, George E.; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 11 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 1079. Cit. Date: 11 May 2014.
5. 1910 U.S. census, population schedule, No. Hempstead, Nassau, New York, enumeration district (ED) 1123, p. 2A, dwelling 22, family 22, Mclean, George E.; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 12 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T624, roll T624 995. Cit. Date: 12 May 2014.
6. Roslyn Cemetery (Letter from Dominick Tarantino, Manager, Roslyn Cemetery, Roslyn, NY dated 24 Mar 2008. List of people in McLean plot #61, Section Old Chart, with Name, Date of Internment and Age (if known)), George E. McLean, Age 47 years 6 mo 15 days. Cit. Date: 10 Apr 2008.

MARGARET FRITH McLEAN (1899-1977)

Margaret Frith McLean circa 1917

Margaret Frith McLean circa 1917

My grandmother Margaret was one of my favorite people. She came to live with us in 1965 when my father was in Vietnam. My mother Shirlee had come hurt her back and Grandma came to take care of my brother and me and never left.

Margaret is also the first step back on the McLean, Frith, and Brimlow lines. I’ll work back through the McLean line and then return to Margaret’s mother and work up the Frith and Brimlow lines.

Margaret Frith McLean was born 22 Apr 1899, in North Hempstead, Queens, New York.1 She was the second daughter of George Edward McLean (1867-1915) and Henrietta “Nettie” Ella Frith (1875-1963). She told me that she often claimed to be one year younger than she really was because being born in the last century made it harder for her to find work.

Margaret and her sisters. l-r Margaret, Susie, Ada

Margaret and her sisters. l-r Margaret, Susie, Ada


Margaret married William Harry Walker on 27 Sep 1919 in Roslyn Heights, Nassau, New York.2 She’d met Harry when he was stationed at nearby Roosevelt Field during World War I. He stayed on Long Island to woo her after the war and worked as a mechanic.
27 Sep 1919 l-r: John Mortimer, Harry Walker, Margaret McLean, Jeannette McLean

27 Sep 1919 l-r: John Mortimer, Harry Walker, Margaret McLean, Jeannette McLean


After their marriage, she and Harry lived with her mother for a short time and can be found with Nettie on the 1920 Census.3 Margaret and Harry moved to his hometown of Philadelphia shortly thereafter. Their first child Harry Craig Walker was born there on 21 Aug 1923.4 In the summer of 1927, Margaret went back to Long Island to escape the city heat as she awaited the birth of daughter Shirlee Delores Walker. Shirlee was born 18 Jul 1927 in Howard Beach, Queens, New York.5
Margaret and Harry Circa 1935

Margaret and Harry Circa 1935


For a number of years, Margaret and Harry resided with Harry’s sister Ruth (Walker) Schoenleber and her husband Bill. Harry had changed careers and become a plasterer and building contractor. The 1930s were lean years and Harry went wherever he needed to in order to find work. Eventually, they were able to afford their own home. They remained in the Kensington section of Philadelphia through the 1950s; Harry’s mother and several siblings lived nearby.
1953 Harry, Margaret, and Shirlee on the Oregon Coast

1953 Harry, Margaret, and Shirlee on the Oregon Coast


When Harry retired, he and Margaret sold their home and moved to Egg Harbor Township, Atlantic, New Jersey. The cost of living was a little lower and Harry wanted to be out of the city. They weren’t there long when Harry suffered a fatal heart attack and passed away on 12 Nov 1961.6 Margaret was devastated. She moved to Horsham, Montgomery, Pennsylvania to be near her son Craig and his family.

In 1965, Margaret joined her daughter Shirlee (Walker) Burgraff in Alpena, Michigan, and remained with Shirlee and her family for the next seven years. In that time, Margaret lived in Michigan, Edmonds, Washington, Hamilton AFB, California, and finally in Eugene, Oregon.

l-r Susie McLean Griffin, Bruce Burgraff, Margaret Walker, Edmund Griffin, Shirlee Walker Burgraff, Jack Brugraff - 1969 Reno, NV

l-r Susie McLean Griffin, Bruce Burgraff, Margaret Walker, Edmund Griffin, Shirlee Walker Burgraff, Jack Brugraff – 1969 Reno, NV


While in Oregon, Margaret met seventy-nine year-old Lloyd Columbus Thomas at a senior citizen’s dance. They married 10 Jan 19727 and remained together until Lloyd’s death 3 Feb 1976.8

Margaret died 19 Mar 1977 in Eugene, Lane, Oregon.9 She was cremated and her ashes were scattered.

Margaret was a gentle, sweet, woman, who was known as the peacemaker in our family. As was normal for the time, her white hair appeared blue from the rinse she used to keep it from appearing dingy, and she was well into her seventies before she wore slacks when it wasn’t snowing. Her skin was flawless, and I remember her commitment to Yardley’s lavender soap and Pond’s Cold Cream. She was soft-spoken, tender-hearted, and loved to play board games, dance, and be with her family.



1. New York Department of Health, birth certificate (1899), Margaret McLean; New York State Dept of Health, Albany. Cit. Date: 19 Jun 2008.
2. Marriage Record, Nassau Co., New York, Marriage License, 27 Sep 1919, William Harry Walker to Margaret Frith McLean. Cit. Date: 4 Jun 2014.
3. 1920 U.S. census, population schedule, Roslyn, No. Hempstead, Nassau, New York, dwelling 187, family 152, MacLean, Nettie; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 12 May 2014)
4. Letter in Margaret Walker’s hand detailing children & grandchildren births, Margaret McLean Walker’s Notes, circa 1960; privately held by Sharon Scott.
5. New York Department of Health, birth certificate 7646 (1927), Shirley Dolores Walker; New York State Dept of Health, Albany. Cit. Date: 19 Jun 2008.
6. New Jersey Department of Health & Senior Services, death certificate (short form), (1961), Harry Walker; New Jersey State Department of Health, Trenton. Cit. Date: 19 Jun 2008.
7. Marriage Certificate, Marriage Certificate, 17 Jan 1972; privately held by Sharon Scott.
8. Oregon Death Index, 1903-1998. Salem, OR, USA: Oregon State Archives and Records Center.
9. Oregon State Health Division, death certificate (1977), Margaret Frith Thomas; Oregon State Health Division Center for Health Statistics, Portland. Cit. Date: 19 Jun 2008.

Daniel and Hannah (Yount) Olinger

One of the problems with genealogy is that we become so focused on moving back that we sometimes fail to take the time to look at an individual life. Often there is little documentation for a particular individual and their importance to us is passed over in search of a relative who “did something.” It is common for all of us to be excited by the ancestor who served in one of the wars, or had a special standing in his community. Those folks interest us so much because “doing something” usually means there are documents to follow. But, the simple fact is that most of us are descended from men and women who simply worked hard and lived good, if unspectacular, lives.

Daniel Olinger and Hannah Yount are two of those rather ordinary people for their time, and yet they were amazing people.

Daniel was born 20 September 1811, and Hannah Yount was born 25 December 1808,1 both in the Kittanning area of Armstrong County.

They were married 10 April 1830 in Kittanning,2 and had ten (known) children:

David (29 Mar 1830 – 17 Sep 1846)
Findley P. (17 Jul 1833 – 15 Aug 1916)
Esther Ann (9 Jun 1837 – 19 Nov 1910)
Mary “Polly” (abt 1840 -)
Margaret (17 Sep 1842 – 25 Jul 1932)
Caroline (1843 – )
Daniel Olinger (1846 – 3 May 1918)
Aaron F. Olinger (20 Nov 1849 – 25 Jun 1911)
Samuel Stoton (Feb 1853 – 4 Dec 1920)
Thomas K. (Aug 1856 – 2 May 1931)
More on the children and their marriages later.

The census records for Daniel and Hannah:
18403
18504
18605
18706
18807
19008

I found no obituary or death notice for Daniel Olinger. The date of his death was provided by Viola in her notes.

Hannah lived to be almost 100 years of age, dying just shy of her birthday on 22 November 1908.9

Daniel and Hannah are two people born before the War of 1812, who raised ten children, and lived through the upheaval and horror of the Civil War. They were born when the nation’s fourth president, James Madison was in office, and Hannah died while Theodore Roosevelt was in office – he was the 26th president. They cleared their own land, planted their own food, and carried their own water. Their lives may not have been as exciting as others may in this line, but they were no less extraordinary.

There were two death notices for Hannah.
[The Indiana Evening Gazette 28 Nov 1908, p1, c7]
MRS. HANNAH OLINGER
Mrs. Hannah Olinger, died at her home in Elderton on Nov. 22, aged about 101 years. She was the oldest woman in this part of the State, and she had lived in Elderton since 1834. Up until several years ago she went, about at will. Nine children survive.

[The Indiana Weekly, 2 Dec 1908, p4, c1]
A Centenarian Dead.
Mrs. Daniel Olinger died suddenly November 22 at the home of her daughter, Easter Ann Olinger at Elderton, aged almost 100 years. Mrs. Olinger was born on Christmas, 1808, and all her life has been spent in the community near Elderton, where her daughter and two sons, Dan and Thomas, live. The other son, Aaron, is a resident of Kittanning.

The obituaries are interesting in the confusion they create. In the first obituary, it states nine children survive. Daniel and Hannah had ten known children, but I could only find eight confirmed alive at the time of Hannah’s death. Oldest son, David died at age 16. Daughter Caroline’s death date is still a mystery to me, although her husband lists himself as a widower on the 1900 census.

In the second obituary only four children are named. The other four (five if you count Caroline) are not mentioned even though two of them (Margaret Olinger Scott and Findley P.) lived in Elderton, not far from their mother.

The next post will be what I know about Daniel and Hannah’s children. Then tombstone pictures before moving back a generation to Adam and Anna Maria (Yount) Olinger.



1. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 104508 (1908), Hannah Olinger; Division of Vital Records, New Castle.
2. Constance Louise (Leinweber) Mateer, Early Deaths & Marriages in Armstrong County, Pennsylavania (Kittanning, Pennsylvania: n.p., 1994), Kittanning Gazette Vol #V I.
3. 1840 U.S. census, Armstrong, Pennsylvania, Kittanning Twp., p. 173, line 10, Daniel Olinger; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 24 Jan 2012); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M704, roll 442.
4. 1850 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., p. 353, dwelling 279, family 279, Daniel Olinger; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 749
5. 1860 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Elderton, p. 613, dwelling 1195, family 1079, Daniel Olinger; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 1069.
6. 1870 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Elderton, p. 372, dwelling 14, family 14, Daniel Olinger; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 1301.
7. 1880 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Elderton, enumeration district (ED) 5, p. 123, dwelling 267, family 285; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 1096.
8. 1900 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Elderton, enumeration district (ED) 11, p. 3A, dwelling 60; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 1373.
9. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 104508 (1908), Hannah Olinger; Division of Vital Records, New Castle, Pennsylvania.

Climbing the Olinger and Yount Tree

Margaret Olinger’s ancestors are generations of Germans who, as I previously mentioned, have been in America since at least the Revolutionary War. While I have done some of the initial verification work, I am still working on most of this – use this line at your own risk. I am working on the verification and getting my own copies of the sources this summer. I have provided the sources I currently have and been clear about what is not sourced.

In order to tie the line together there needs to be some documentation that provides a parent/child relationship. Family stories are nice, but paperwork is best! So here’s what I started.

First and foremost, we need to remember that spelling is optional. Don’t think that a will or census records will provide the correct spelling. Wills and census records were recorded by individuals who may or may not have asked how something was spelled. They may have been asking people who could not read or write how to spell their names. Most of the entries were accomplished either based on the experience of the person doing the writing, or their best guess based on how the name sounded. Men who clerked or “scribed” had no special grasp of spelling. I have seen the same name spelled three different ways in a single document. Most names did not reach a finalized form until Social Security began. Once you spelled it a certain way with the federal government – that was pretty close to how it remained. Our family uses the spelling of Olinger, but there are many Ohlingers in the tree. So when searching for Olinger you need to flexible and search for Olinger, Ollinger, and Ohlinger, and try substituting an e for an i and the letter j for g. The Yount line is often found as Yont, Yunt, and Yundt. I have also seen it spelled Jundt in some trees.

I am sure of whom Margaret Olinger’s parents are for two reasons. First – Viola Lawton Scott gathered the initial information directly from Margaret Olinger when she was alive. This is why I’m comfortable with using the date of births that I have. Second – I have Margaret Olinger’s 1932 death certificate which names her parents are Daniel Olinger and Hannah Yount.1 This could get confusing as we work are way back since there are several Olingers who have married Younts.

Daniel Olinger was born 20 September 1811 in Armstrong County, the youngest known son of Adam and Anna Maria (Yount) Olinger. (Yes, Yount again. Daniel and Hannah are first cousins.) I have seen various locations listed for his birth including Kittanning and Elderton. Daniel’s family was enumerated on the 1820 census in Kittanning Twp., Armstrong, Pennsylvania. Elderton was not incorporated as a borough until 1859.

Daniel married Hannah Yount on 10 April 1830 in Kittanning Twp. The newspaper notice of their marriage reads “Mr. Daniel Ohlinger, to Miss Hannah Yundt, dau. of Jonathan Yundt all of Kittanning Twp.”2 Hannah is the fifth child of Jonathan and Maria Margaret (Riscinger) Yount. Jonathan is the brother of Daniel’s mother Anna Maria. More on Daniel and Hannah in the next post.



1. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 73280 (1932), Margaret Scott; Division of Vital Records, New Castle, Pennsylvania.
2. Constance Louise (Leinweber) Mateer, Early Deaths & Marriages in Armstrong County, Pennsylavania (Kittanning, Pennsylvania: n.p., 1994), Kittanning Gazette Vol #V I.

Margaret (Olinger) Scott (1842-1932)

Stepping back a generation in the Scott family, my next series of posts will focus on the Olinger and Yount lines. The Olinger and Yount families have been in Pennsylvania since before the Revolutionary War and are (fortunately for me) reasonably well documented. I have provided a pedigree chart from Robert Clare Scott in case you’ve lost track – I constantly have to refer back to my notes and charts in this family. It’s simply a lot of people to keep track of.

Margaret Olinger was born 17 September 1842 in Plumcreek Township, Armstrong County.1 She was the fifth child of Daniel Olinger (20 September 1811 – 23 May 1878) and Hannah Yount (25 December 1807 – 22 November 1908).2 I did not find a baptismal record for her in the church records in Gastown. It is possible that she may eventually be found in another church in the area, but many of those records have not been filmed or transcribed. Nor did I find a marriage record for Margaret and Zachariah. It is probable that they were married in the home of a family member. The records of a minister belonged to him not to the church, and there were no requirements to record these events at the courthouse or in the minister’s home church documents.

After Zachariah’s death 14 October 1900, Margaret Olinger Scott continued to live in the home that she had shared with him. Her grandson, Savandus “Curly” Taylor Schall (1900-1988) moved in and is enumerated with her on the
1910, 1920, and 1930 censuses.3,4,5 Margaret outlived Zachariah by almost 32 years and died at the age of 89 on 28 July 1932 in Elderton of Chronic Aortic Insufficiency.6 89 years on a weak heart!!!

Margaret is buried with Zachariah in the Elderton Cemetery. Curly and his family are nearby.

MRS. MARGARET SCOTT

A complication of disease caused the death in Elderton at 9:50 p.m., Monday of Mrs. Margaret (Olinger) Scott, aged 89 years, ten months and eight days. She had always lived in the vicinity of her death and was a member of the Presbyterian Church. She leaves two sons and a daughter. J. P. Scott of Idaho, D. G. Scott of Holton, Kansas and Mrs. Annie Schall of Elderton. She also leaves 16 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be conducted in the Elderton Presbyterian Church at 2:00 p.m. Thursday [28 Jul], with burial in Elderton cemetery.7

Margaret Scott with sons Frank and J.P



1. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 73280 (1932), Margaret Scott; Division of Vital Records, New Castle.
2. ibid
3. 1910 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania population schedule, Elderton, enumeration district (ED) 37, p. 3B, dwelling 69; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T624, roll 1310.
4. 1920 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania population schedule, Plumcreek, enumeration district (ED) 15, p. 7A, dwelling 3; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T625, roll 1508.
5. 1930 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 42, p. 1A, dwelling 4; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T626, roll 1994.
6. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 73280 (1932), Margaret Scott; Division of Vital Records, New Castle.
8. Obituary, “SCOTT,” The Indiana Weekly Messenger, 28 Jul 1938; digital images.

Peter Shaffer (1852-1935)

I think we need a little recap of where we are in the tree, it’s easy to get lost in the jumble of names. We are going to go up the Shaffer line next. While Peter Shaffer is not the biological father of Anna Mary Beatty, he was the husband of Nancy M.J. Beatty and Anna’s children considered him to be their grandfather. I have noted that he is her stepfather, but he appears on our family tree in the paternal slot. So here once again is the tree of Robert Clare Scott and we are looking at his mother’s paternal line.

Peter was born 12 Jan 1852, in Plumcreek Township, Armstrong, Pennsylvania, the son of John and Harriet (Craig) Shaffer. Right off the bat, we have the first “diffugilty.” His Pennsylvania death certificate and his obituary both state he was born in 1849.1,2 His tombstone actually has the correct date of 1852.

Why do we know the stone is right and the documents are wrong? He does not appear on the 1850 census with his parents, but he does appear on the 1860 census at the age of seven.3,4 He remains consistent in his age on the census records from 1870 – 1920, usually declaring himself to be born in 1852 (ages: 19, 28, 48, 58, 69).5,6,7,8,9 The only time this varies is on the 1930 census when his age is listed as 81.10 He is living with his son and his family so it is possible that Peter was not the informant. The informant on his death certificate was Mrs. John Frailey. That’s right, Peter and Nancy M.J.’s daughter Minnie. The same one who was living with her grandmother Rebecca Beatty on the 1900 census when all of Rebecca’s information changed. I have gone with the 1852 date that is consistent with the records that either he or his parents would have provided.

The second “diffugilty” comes with the middle name. As I mentioned in my post about Nancy, the middle names are an issue. Peter never appears on any documents (created while he is alive) with a middle initial or name. The only times the initial K appears is on his death certificate and then again in his obituary. That information was provided by daughter Minnie. The next odd middle name, Levi, appears in the obituary of his son Christopher and is probably provided by his daughter-in-law Zula.11 At the time Christopher died, Zula would have been well up in her 70s and Peter had been dead over forty years. I have not yet found the name of Levi used by any other Shaffer or Craig family members of Peter’s generation or previous.

His tombstone reads simply Peter Shaffer, which I believe to be the most correct. Based on the records created while he was alive, I have chosen not to use the middle initial or middle name. I will continue to explore records to see if he ever uses an initial on either tax, land, or voting records.

I have provided links to the images of all the census records on which Peter appears:
1860
1870
1880
1900
1910
1920
1930

He married Nancy M.J. Beatty in about 1874. I have not yet found a marriage record for the couple. This date is based on the 1900 census and the birth of their first child together. Peter remained in Plumcreek Township his entire life and did not remarry after Nancy died in 1909.

I found this article in the Simpson Leader Times newspaper dated 31 October 1931:12

Elderton Farmer Injured
An 80 year old Elderton farmer lay in his home today with a serious head injury, suffered when the wagon on which he and a 30 year old son were riding, was wrecked in a heavy fog Thursday morning.
The farmer, Peter Shaffer, living about a mile from Elderton, was unable to recognize members of his family late yesterday. He is in a semi-conscious condition.
The son, Christopher Shaffer, was less seriously injured.
The two were enroute to another farm when a car driven by Joseph Coulter, of Girty, enroute to Kittanning, collided with the wagon in the heavy fog.
The force of the collision hurled the two men on the wagon onto the concrete.
They were taken to their homes and Dr. E. E. Keeler of Elderton was summoned. He has been administering treatment since.

Peter died 4 January 1934 in Plumcreek Township of apoplexy. His death certificate lists the secondary cause as epilepsy, listing the duration of that condition as three years, possibly linking it to the accident above. He is buried with his wife Nancy in the Elderton Cemetery.

Peter Shaffer and Nancy M.J. Beatty had the following children together:

Minnie Elizabeth (28 Jun 1875 – 26 Jun 1944) m. John R. Frailey (abt. 1873 – 1953). Remained in the Elderton area all their lives, buried in Elderton Cemetery.
Charles Wilmer (18 Jun 1877 – 26 Aug 1939) m. Lillian May Kelley (1881 – 1922). Remained in the Elderton area all their lives, buried in Elderton Cemetery.
Leason J. Shaffer (Jan 1880 – 19XX) m. Mary A. Hilliard (15 Oct 1882 – 18 Jul 1942). Removed to Niles, Trumbull, Ohio, buried in Elderton Cemetery. His tombstone does not have the last two digits engraved.
Harry Oliver (11 Jun 1882 – 17 Mar 1960) m. Martha Pearl Williams (30 Mar 1886 – 17 May 1968). Remained in the Elderton area all their lives, buried in Elderton Cemetery.
George Addison (30 Sep 1887 – 26 Jan 1967) m. Zelma Smith (25 Sep 1895 – 26 Jan 1978) Remained in Elderton most of their lives, removed to Corning, Stueben, New York much later. Buried in Elderton Cemetery.
Christopher Nesbitt (1 Nov 1889 – 10 Jul 1976) m. Zula Agnes Smeltzer (15 Aug 1894 – 21 Nov 1986). Remained in the Elderton area all their lives, buried in Elderton Cemetery.

I have not included family group sheets for these people because many of their children are still living.

Does anyone have a picture of Peter Shaffer? If so I would very much like a scan of the image for Peter or his wife Nancy.

My next post will be the tombstones of these family members and then we will move back a generation and attempt to deal with Peter’s parents, John and Harriet (Craig) Shaffer.



1. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 2875 (1934), Peter K. Shaffer; Division of Vital Records, New Castle.
2. Obituary, “Peter K. Shaffer,” The Indiana Evening Gazette, 5 Jan 1934; digital images.
3. 1850 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., p. 342A, dwelling 120, family 120, John Sheaffer; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 20 Dec 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll M432 749.
4. 1860 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., p. 728, dwelling 991, family 879, John Sheaffer; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 20 Dec 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll M653 1069.
5. 1870 U.S. census, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Armstrong Twp., p. 13, dwelling 184, family 192, John Shaffer; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 1350.
6. 1880 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 5, p. 124, dwelling 283, family 301, Peter Shaeffer; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 6 Mar 2010); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 1096.
7. 1900 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 11, p. 6B, dwelling 137; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 1373.
8. 1910 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 37, p. 5, dwelling 79; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T624, roll 1310.
9. 1920 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 15, p. 4A, dwelling 68; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T625, roll 1508.
10. 1930 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 42, p. 13A, dwelling 298; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T626, roll 1994.
11. Death Record, “Christopher N. Shaffer,” The Simpson Leader Times, 10 Jul 1976, p. 7, col. 8; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 19 Dec 2011), Historic Newspapers.
12. News Article, “Elderton Farmer Injured,” The Simpson Leader Times, 30 Oct 1931, p. 1; digital images.

The Children of Rebecca and James Beatty

Information about the five children of Rebecca and James.

Elizabeth Angeline Beatty (1850-1918) m. James Young (1854-1914) in about 1877. I believe she may have been known as Angeline. This is based on the 1850 and 1880 census.1,2 According to the 1900 census, she and James had no children of their own, but it does list an adopted daughter Mary E. Young.3 I have not yet located any records of their marriage, death or obituaries. Their death dates come from their tombstone in Elderton Cemetery.

Jane Isabella Beatty (chr. 18 May 1851 – bef 1860). She never appears in any record except the baptismal.4 It is probable (pure speculation) that she is in an unmarked grave in Plum Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery where she and several of her siblings were baptized and other family members are buried.

Nancy M. J. Beatty (1853-1909) documented in her own post.

Caroline “Callie” Beatty (1859 – 1891) m. Elias Clark Beer (1860-1932) I had trouble finding Caroline, but finally located Clark and in his obituary found that she was constantly referred to as “Callie.”5 Her tombstone reads Cally Beer. She married Clark in about 1881, and had four children before dying in 1891 – everything happened in between census records. I have found no marriage record, obituary, or mention of Callie’s death; however, her tombstone is in Elderton Cemetery.

What has been freaky was the story of Callie’s two sons. First of her children to die was son John Beer. John was born in Jan 1885 and died 2 May 1921 in a horrifying accident. Sixty years after Caroline’s father was killed by a train – so was John. And the account was no less graphic.6

FARMER MET INSTANT DEATH WHEN STRUCK BY TRAIN
His Brother Witnesses the Tragedy While the Two Were Returning Home

John Beer, aged 30 years of Armstrong township, was instantly killed on Monday evening shortly after 5 o’clock when he was run down by the local freight on the B.R.&P. railroad between Thomas and Shelocta stations. His body was horribly mangled, the top of the head being torn off and a leg and arm cut off and the body almost severed at the trunk. His brother, Harry, who witnessed the shocking accident, was unable to rescue him. The two brothers, who jointly owned and conducted a farm near Shelocta, were in Indiana on Monday transacting business and late in the afternoon went to Creekside on the trolley car. At this point they decided to walk home and following the railroad had completed the greater part of the journey. Both were on the railroad track when the freight, running north, approached, and while the train was in plain view the unfortunate man failed to clear the tracks. The deceased was regarded as one of the most industrious and successful young farmers of that sections and was prominently know in that community, and both he and his brother, who were unmarried, occupied the same home on the farm. Besides his brother he is survived by two sisters and his father, Clark Beer, who also resides in Armstrong township. Interment will be made in Oakland cemetery at this place. [Note – His tombstone is in Elderton Cemetery.]

John Beer

As if that wasn’t enough – 10 years later, oldest son Harry Edwin Beer is killed when he was hit by a car.7

OTHER ACCIDENTS Harvey Edwin Beer, 49 years old, of Shelocta, R.D., who was fatally injured when a car operated by a hit-and-run driver crashed into him on the Benjamin Franklin highway, about a quarter of a mile west of Shelocta, about 11:30 o’clock Saturday, died from the result of his injuries in the Indiana hospital at 8:15 o’clock Sunday morning. According to State Motor Patrolman Corp. Harry Fulton, who investigated the accident, Beer, who was enroute to his home, after shopping in Shelocta, was walking west along the highway. In his arms he carried bread and other articles. He had been accompanied by two boys who left him a short distance from the scene of the accident. It has not been learned whether, Beer was blinded by the headlights of the death car and stepped in its path, or whether the operator did not observe him in time to avoid the crash. When the car crashed into him, he was hurled 12 feet off the side of the highway. The operator of the car hit-and-run and Mr. Beer, who had been rendered unconscious, lay along the side of-the highway ,for some time before he was discovered by a passing motorist from Pontiac, Michigan, whose name could not be learned this morning. When Robinson’s ambulance responded to the call Mr. Beer was removed to the Indiana hospital where an examination by staff surgeons revealed he had sustained concussion of the brain, a fractured left leg and shoulder and his left side practically caved in. He died six and a half hours later without regaining consciousness. Members of the motor patrol are searching for the hit-and-run driver today. A son of Clark and Callie (Beatty) Beer, the deceased was born in Plumcreek township, near Shelocta, September 14th, 1882. He lived his entire life in the home of his father, where he followed the occupation of a farmer. He leaves his father and two sisters: Mrs. Laura Metz, of 310 Water street, Indiana and Mrs. Wade Chambers, of Colgate, Maryland. Funeral services will be conducted in the home of the deceased’s sister Mrs. Laura Metz, 310, Water street, Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Interment will follow in the Elderton cemetery.

Harry Beer

Note to self – Do not walk anywhere with Beatty men or their descendents in Indiana County in a year ending in one!

William James Beatty (1861-1920) first married Martha Jane Shaffer (1858 – 1891). Martha Jane is the sister of Peter Shaffer, Nancy M.J. Beatty’s husband. She also died in 1891, which makes me wonder if it was a bad influenza year or if some other type of disease was running rampant. William James and Martha Jane had four children together. Martha is in Elderton Cemetery.

His second marriage was to Amanda Jane Ramsey Uncapher (1858-1956). He had four children with Jane. Jane is also in Elderton Cemetery.

William James is in Elderton Cemetery according to his obituary, but he has no tombstone.



Photographs courtesy of Ralph Satterfield.
1. 1850 U.S. census, Indiana, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Washington Twp, p. 220, dwelling 141, family 141, Angeline Baty; digital images, Ancestry (http//www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 785.
2. 1880 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp., enumeration district (ED) 5, p. 126A, dwelling 309, family 331, Angeline Young; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 23 Dec 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 1096.
3. 1900 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Elderton, enumeration district (ED) 11, p. 2B, dwelling 38, family 38, Elizabeth Young; digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.Ancestry.com : accessed 23 Dec 2011); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 1373.
4. Treasures of the Past, “Plumcreek Presbyterian Church Baptism Records,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 Jun 2011), Beatty, Jane Isabela, baptized 18 May 1851.
5. “Elias Clark Beer Obituary,” The Indiana Evening Gazette, 10 Oct 1932, p. 1, col. 4; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 1 Jan 2012).
6. “FARMER MET INSTANT DEATH WHEN STRUCK BY TRAIN,” The Indiana Progress, 4 May 1921, p. 1, col. 1; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 1 Jan 2012).
7. “OTHER ACCIDENTS,” The Indiana Evening Gazette, 31 Aug 1931, p. 1, col. 1; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 31 Dec 2011).