The Brimlow’s Baker’s Dozen

The Children of George Brimlow and Elizabeth Weeks

Mary Jane Brimlow b. 11 Dec 1843, New York City, died before 1850. She was found in the Baptismal Register of the Reverend Henry Chase of New York, FHL Film #17,777. She did not appear on the 1850 Census and is not in the family plot which was started in 1851. It is possible that she was one of the thousands who died of influenza in New York 1847-48 or in 1849 from the Cholera epidemic that overran the city.

Elizabeth Ann Brimlow b. Apr 1845 New York City, died 27 Nov 1932, Rockaway Beach, Kings, New York, buried 30 Nov 1932, Cypress Hills Cemetery.1 Elizabeth married John M. Elliott (Dec 1843 – 6 Jan 1908) in about 1864.2 John was the son of Alfred and Cecilia Elliott and had served in Co B of the 158th New York Infantry during the Civil War. Elizabeth collected a widow’s pension after his death.3 They had three known children: Cordelia Edith (Elliott) Roscoe Kuck (Jun 1865 – 29 Sep 1940) m1 Norman Roscoe (1964-1911) m2 Robert Kuck (1861-1946); Cecelia E. Elliott (1869 – 27 Apr 1876); John M. Elliott Jr. (1874 – bef 1880).

Henrietta F. Brimlow b. 7 Sep 1847 Brooklyn, died 26 Dec 1884 Brooklyn, married George Richard Frith. Covered in a previous post.

Caroline Brimlow b. Dec 1849, died abt 1850. She appears on the 1850 census at age 7 months,4 but is not on the 1855 NY Census. Nor is she in the family plot which began in Mar 1851. No record of her passing has yet been found.

Jane Eliza Brimlow b. 13 Feb 1851 Brooklyn, died Feb 1931 New York, buried 18 Feb 1931 Cypress Hills Cemetery.5,6 Jane married Charles Peakes Lloyd on 12 Nov 1871 in Brooklyn.7 Charles was born in Nov 1846 and was christened on 6 Dec 1846 in Aberystruth, Monmouthshire, Wales, the son of Joseph Lloyd and Eliza Perkes/Peakes.8 He immigrated in about 1868 and worked as a steam fitter. Charles died 14 Nov 1923.9 Both he and Jane are buried in the Masonic plot of Cypress Hills. They had six known children: Joseph Lloyd (1873 – 22 Apr 1875); Lizzie E. Lloyd (1874 – 28 Mar 1875); Cornelia M. Lloyd (1876 – 25 Dec 1880); George D. Lloyd (1 Dec 1877 – 28 Jan 1954) m. Minnie M. Platte (1884-?); John Elliott Lloyd (13 Mar 1880 – 18 Mar 1880); Charles Edward Lloyd (24 Aug 1881 – 17 Dec 1929) m. Anna Dora Euler (1883-1971).

Mary Ann Brimlow b. 1853 Brooklyn, died Dec 1855, buried 15 Dec 1855 Cypress Hills Cemetery.10 She appeared on the Jun 1855 NY State Census with her parents.11 I did not find her in the death records.

George Washington Brimlow b. 9 Aug 1853 Brooklyn, died 8 May 1893 Brooklyn, buried 11 May 1893 Cypress Hills Cemetery.12 George worked as a house painter and grainer. He married Ida M. Lane on 15 Apr 1873 in Brooklyn.13 Ida (1 May 1856 – 1 Jul 1928) was the daughter of Daniel Lane and Elizabeth Miller.14 After George’s death, Ida married William H. Lock (Sep 1850 – 26 Oct 1931)15 on 21 Dec 1895.16 She and William are both buried in Cypress Hills Cemetery. George and Ida had six known children together: George W. Brimlow (31 Oct 1875 – aft 1942) m. Margaret Loretta Moran (1881-1926); Theodore Clarence Brimlow (1 Oct 1877 – aft 1940) m. Jennie W. Alomott (1880-?); John Merrell Brimlow (10 Jan 1881 – 4 Oct 1948) m. Kathryne R. Steckley (1886-1947); William Henry Brimlow (23 Jun 1883 – 18 Dec 1934) m. Elizabeth L. Allen (1884-aft 1951); Florence May Brimlow (15 Jan 1886 – 1 Jan 1931) m1. Robert H.F. Clark (1878-?) m2 Edward Bolomey; Georgeanna Mildred Brimlow (1893 – 4 Aug 1894).

Cornelia M. Brimlow b. 1856 Brooklyn, died 30 Sep 1905 Brooklyn, buried 2 Oct 1905 Cypress Hills Cemetery.17 Cornelia married Charles J.C. Nielsen on 8 Oct 1879 in Brooklyn.18 Charles (16 Aug 1851 – 8 Mar 1920) was born in Elsinore, Denmark and immigrated in Sep 1861.19,20 His occupation was as tobacconist or cigar manufacturer. Cornelia and Charles had five known children: Charles J. Nielsen Jr. (1882 – 5 Sep 1889); Olaf Andrew Nielsen (17 Jul 1883 – 22 May 1913); Allyn Field Nielsen (22 Jul 1888 – 20 Dec 1947) m. Minerva Wilhelma Helling (26 Sep 1890 – Jul 1985); Ethel A. Nielsen (Nov 1890 – ?); Albert Goodwin Nielsen (6 Feb 1892 – 20 Oct 1955) m. Grace E. Camp (18 Sep 1891 – 26 Nov 1991)

Ada May Brimlow b. Jan 1859 Brooklyn, died 3 Feb 1900 Brooklyn, buried 6 Feb 1900 Mt. Olivet Cemetery.21 Ada married Henry William Pidgeon on 6 Oct 1880.22 Henry (20 Dec 1856 – 5 May 1926) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was the son of John T. Pidgeon and Ellen Umstead.23 They had 8 known children together: Elizabeth Ellen Pidgeon (19 Aug 1882-6 Oct 1951) m1 Thomas Denis Ryan (1868-1913) m2 Martin J. Ryan (1876-1923); Ada May Pidgeon (6 Feb 1884-Nov 1973) m. Thomas Bartley (1883-1973); Cordelia E. Pidgeon (14 Feb 1886-Aug 1976) m. Adolph Weismantel; Henry William Pidgeon (13 Aug 1888-Apr 1973) m. Leah Bernice Westcott (1888-1873); John H. Pidgeon (1889-2 Oct 1889); Norman R. Pidgeon (23 Nov 1894-26 May 1919); Annie L. Pidgeon (28 Sep 1896-12 Aug 1970) m. Floyd Henry Frankenstein (1896-1996); Infant Pidgeon (3 Feb 1900-3 Feb 1900).

Ida Brimlow b Jan 1859 Brooklyn, died 29 Mar 1866, buried 31 Mar 1866 Cypress Hills Cemetery.24 Twin sister to Ada May, Ida died of Cholera. I have not yet found a death certificate so it is possible she died outside the city.

Josephine E. Brimlow b. 1861 Brooklyn, died 25 Dec 1865 Brooklyn, buried 26 Dec 1865 Cypress Hills Cemetery.25 Found in the NY Death Index on Ancestry indexed as Josephine Bremton. In the FamilySearch NY Death Records the only Josephine of this age is shown as Josephine Brandon died 24 Dec 1865. I’ll have to check the certificate in Salt Lake City.

William Joseph Brimlow b 1861 Brooklyn, died 18 Jul 1862 Brooklyn, buried 19 Jul 1862 Cypress Hills Cemetery.26 Twin brother of Josephine. He’s in the NY Death Index, but I haven’t found his death record yet.

Charles E. Brimlow b 1864 Brooklyn, died 27 Apr 1893 Brooklyn, buried 30 Apr 1893 Cypress Hills Cemetery.27 There is a marriage record dated 16 Mar 1887 to Hattie Meddlar in Brooklyn,28 but on his death record he is listed as single. I found no death or marriage records for Hattie.



1. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 28 Nov 2015), Elizabeth Ann Elliott, 27 Nov 1932; citing Death, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 2,070,586.
2. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 28 Nov 2015), John M Elliott, 06 Jan 1908; citing Death, New York City, Queens, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,323,409.
3. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934
4. 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, New York, New York, p. 160B, dwelling 948, family 2240, Geo. Brimlow; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 20 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll M432 539. Cit. Date: 20 May 2014.
5. “Family Search,” database, “New York Births and Christenings, 1640-1962,” FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FDYL-B8G:accessed 18 October 2015), Jane Eliza Brimbow, 13 Feb 1851; citing, reference; FHL microfilm 17,777.
6. Interment Records, Cypress Hills Cemetery, Jane E. Lloyd, interred 18 Feb 1931, Sec 17, Lot 160A, Masonic Section.
7. Kings, New York, Marriage Certificates Brooklyn 1866-1937, 2097, Charles Peakes Lloyd-Jane Eliza Brimlow, 12 Nov 1871; FHL microfilm 1,543,859. Cit. Date: 3 Aug 2010.
8. “Family Search,” database, Beaufort Church, Charles Lloyd, s. Joseph Lloyd of Ebbw Vale, pattern maker, by Eliza his wife. Charles Lloyd, 06 Dec 1846, Baptism; citing Aberystruth, Monmouthshire, Wales, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey; FHL microfilm 2,411,675.
9. “New York Death Records,” database(accessed 28 Nov 2015), Charles Perks Lloyd, 14 Nov 1923; citing Death, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 2,032,197.
10. Cypress Hills Cemetery (Brooklyn, Queens, New York), Plot Records, Mary A Brimlow, interred 15 Dec 1855, grave 4, Sec 2, Lot 168, dau of G & E. Brimlow .
11. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn, Kings, E.D. 2, p. 1, family 2, line 12, Geo Brimlow; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 20 May 2014). Cit. Date: 20 May 2014
12. “New York Death Records,” database(accessed 28 Nov 2015), Death Index Geo W. Brimhow Cert #7842; Fam Search -George W. Bramlow, 08 May 1893; citing Death, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,323,903.
13. “New York, New York, marriage Indexes 1866-1937,” database (accessed 26 Apr 2014), Geo W Brimlow/Ida M. Lane, 15 Apr 1873, Kings, Cert #610.
14. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 28 Nov 2015), Ida M. Lock, 01 Jul 1928; citing Death, New York City, Queens, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 2,169,603.
15. William Lock, 26 Oct 1931; citing Death, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 2,069,668.
16. “New York, New York, marriage Indexes 1866-1937,” database (accessed 28 Nov 2015), Cert #6550 21 Dec 1895 William H. Lock to Ida Brimlow, Kings.
17. “New York Death Records,” database(accessed 28 Nov 2015), “New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WFV-D1B, Cornelia M. Nielsen, 30 Sep 1905; citing Death, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York.
18. “New York, New York, marriage Indexes 1866-1937,” database (accessed 26 Apr 2014), Cornelia Brimlow/Charles J. Nielsen, 8 Oct 1879, Kings, Cert #2369.
19. “U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925,” database and images, Ancestry.com (accessed 29 Nov 2015); Charles J.C. Nielsen, born 26 Aug 1851 Elsinore, Denmark, arrive Sep 1861 S.S. Navigator from Consbull Russia, Cigar Dealer.
20. “Obituary – Nielsen,” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 9 May 1920, p. 9 c.2; digital images. Cit. Date: 26 Apr 2014.
21. “New York Death Records,” database(accessed 26 Oct 2015), Certificate #2211, Ada Pidgeon, died 3 Feb 1900, age 41, indexed on FamilySearch as Ada Pedgron, parent Brenlou
22. “New York, New York, marriage Indexes 1866-1937,” database (accessed 26 Apr 2014), Ada Brimlow/H. Henry Pidgeon, 6 Oct 1880, Kings, Cert#2866. Cit. Date: 26 Apr 2014.
23. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 26 Oct 2015), Certificate #2900, Henry W. Pidgeon, died 5 May 1926, age 68, buried Flushing Cemetery.
24. Interment Records, Cypress Hills Cemetery, Ida Brimlow interred 31 Mar 1866, Sec 2, Lot 168. Cit. Date: 22 May 2014.
25. Interment Records, Cypress Hills Cemetery, Josephine Brimlow interred 26 Dec 1865, Sec 2, Lot 168.
26. Interment Records, Cypress Hills Cemetery, William J. Brimlow interred 19 Jul 1862, Sec 2 Lot 168.
27. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 28 Nov 2015), Charles Brimlow, 27 Apr 1893; citing Death, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States, New York Municipal Archives, New York; FHL microfilm 1,323,902.
28. New York, New York, Marriage Indexes 1866-1937 Charles E. Brimlow to Hattie Meddlar 16 Mar 1887, Kings.

Frith Strong

Frances C. (Frith) Bagwell Maxwell Maddern

I previously spoke about how strong of a woman Susan Wynn Frith McLean was in managing life with Civil War veteran Peter B. McLean. However, strong women appear to run in the family, including older sister Fanny.

Fanny C. Frith was born 11 Oct 1837 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, the oldest daughter of William Henry Frith and Frances Catherine Brown.1 Her parents had both passed away before her 18th birthday and as the oldest, Fanny no doubt felt responsible for the care of her younger siblings who ranged in age from 16 down to less than a year. I have not been able to locate Fanny or her siblings definitively on the 1855 New York (NY) State Census.

Searching for Fanny proved difficult at times, but it all came down to marriage records, newspapers, and death and cemetery records. Thank goodness for those cemetery records. When looking at the records for the Brown/Frith Family Plot in Cypress Hills the name William E. Bagwell stood out. Not a Frith or Brown, he had to be the husband of one of the girls. He was interred at the age of 28 on 26 Nov 1863. A search of the 1860 Federal Census turned up William E. Bagwell born about 1835 in New York with wife Fanny C., born about 1937, living in Brooklyn.2 A painter by trade, it is probable they met through her sister Susan’s husband Peter B. McLean who owned a painting business in Brooklyn.

It appears she married William E. Bagwell in about 1858-59. No marriage record has yet been found and it is not known who his parents are. He’s on his own in the 1850 Census,3 but I have not yet been able to locate him on the 1855 NY either. I’ll look into pulling his actual 23 Nov 1863 death certificate4 on my next trip to Salt Lake City in hopes of finding out his parentage. [Update – shown at end of paragraph.] What I did find was a news article about his death.5 William was painting the side of a ship when another ship, under tow, collided with his ship. He was crushed between the two ships. The article is below. I followed the story by searching for information on the ships and learned that the captain of the “propeller” Liberty (tug/push boat) was indeed arrested and charged with recklessness and believed to be intoxicated at the time.
Bagwell BDE tue 24 Nov 1863 p1c1William’s probate records revealed he had a daughter, Annie Elizabeth Bagwell.6 I searched for Fanny and Annie Bagwell in the 1865 NY State Census but had no luck. However, in the 1870 Federal Census, daughter Annie E. Bagwell showed up in with mother Fanny C. Maxwell in the household of William Maxwell. Once I had his name, I easily found the family on the 1865 NY. Annie Bagwell was enumerated as Maxwell.7

1863 Coroner's findings/death certificate for William Bagwell

1863 Coroner’s findings/death certificate for William Bagwell

William H. Maxwell was born about 1840 in Glasgow, Scotland and worked as a carpenter, builder, and a foreman in the Department of City Works in Brooklyn. He’d served in the 84th NY Infantry, Co. H and was injured at Bull Run in 28 Aug 1862 and discharged with a disability on 13 Jan 1863. Once again, it is probable that Peter B. McLean introduced Fanny to her future husband as both men were veterans who’d been injured in the Civil War and were both in the construction industry.8 Fanny and Annie can be found with William Maxwell through the 1880 Census.9

Max Thu 28 Jun 1883 p3Something went terribly wrong in the evening hours of 27 Jun 1883 and William H. Maxwell shot himself in the head at his home. The circumstances of the event were unclear as noted in the article SUICIDE OR ACCIDENT from The Brooklyn Daily Eagle the following day.10 He succumbed to the wound 13 days later, 10 Jul 1883, remaining at home in the care of his wife and doctor during that time. They were unable to remove the bullet and his death came from traumatic meningitis. He didn’t fall unconscious until three days before his death.11,12Max Tue 10 Jul 1883 BDE, p4 c3 Due to the questionable circumstances, the coroner held an inquest on 11 July and the jury found that the shooting was accidental.13
Max Wed 11 Jul 1883 BDE p4 c8
I’m still fascinated by the fact that in the first article, Fanny refused to let in the police or their surgeon, but surrendered the weapon to them. William Maxwell appeared to be well-liked and respected in the family as step-daughter Annie used his name throughout her life, and Fanny’s sister Ruth and her husband named son William Maxwell Reed for him. Almost twenty years after the death of her first husband, Fanny buried her second husband. William was laid to rest in Green-Wood Cemetery on 13 Jul 1883.14

Meanwhile, Fanny’s only child had married Ernest Albert (1857-1946) in about 1882. Ernest was a distinguished theatrical and scenic set designer, and it is probable that Fanny met her next husband Richard H. Maddern through him. Richard was a well-known musician and orchestra leader and both men were working in the same theaters during this time.

On 29 Jun 1885, Fanny married Richard Henry Maddern.15 Richard was born 18 Dec 1839, in England, the son of Richard and Grace (Thomas) Maddern.16 According to information found in an obituary for his niece, Minnie Maddern Fiske, the family ran a touring theatrical company known as the Maddern Family Band. On 2 Aug 1861, he enlisted in the Union Army from Keokuk, Iowa, and was mustered out on 16 Aug 1862 in Memphis, Tennessee, having served as the band director in Band 6 of the Iowa Infantry. He applied for and received an invalid pension on 13 May 1905 for that service.17 According to one of his obituaries published in New York, “Mr. Maddern for many years was successively in charge of the orchestra of the Grand Opera House and Pope’s Theater, St Louis, the Chicago Opera House and later that at Daly’s in this city.”18 Richard passed away on 24 Dec 1917 in the Bronx and was laid to rest 27 Dec 1917 in Woodlawn Cemetery.19

Fanny passed away 11 Feb 1918 in the Bronx and was buried the following day in Woodlawn with Richard.20 Her passing was noted in The New York Tribune.21Fanny NYTrib 12 Feb 1918 p13c7



1. New York City of New York death certificate 1177 (1918), Fanny C. Maddern, 11 Feb 1918. Cit. Date: 26 Jun 2014.
2. 1860 U.S. census, population schedule, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, p. 395, dwelling 616, family 1120, William Bagwell, 26, Fanney Bagwell, 20; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 12 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll M653 774. Cit. Date: 12 May 2014.
3. 1850 U.S. census, population schedule, Williamsburg, Kings, New York, p. 403B, family 1091, Wm Bagwell, 16, New York; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 30 Oct 2015); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll M432 522.
4. “New York Death Records,” database, Certificate #7018, William E. Bagwell, died 23 Nov 1863, age 30, buried Cypress Hills Cemetery.
5. “FATAL ACCIDENT AT THE NAVY YARD,” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 24 Nov 1863, p. 1, col. 1; digital images(accessed 13 May 2014). Cit. Date: 13 May 2014.
6. William E. Bagwell, 19 Dec 1863, Kings, New York, Letters of Administration for widow Fanny C. Bagwell, also named daughter Annie Elizabeth Bagwell; digital images.
7. 1865 New York State Census, Brooklyn, Kings, p. 51, family 371, line 1, William Maxwell, 26, Scotland, Builder, Frances Maxwell, 27, Wife, Kings, Anna E. Maxwell, 6, Child, Kings; digital images (accessed 30 Oct 2015). Cit. Date: 30 Oct 2015.
8. New York State Archives, Cultural Education Center, Albany, New York; New York Civil War Muster Roll Abstracts, 1861-1900; Archive Collection #: 13775-83; Box #: 353; Roll #: 122-1228
9. 1880 U.S. census, population schedule, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, enumeration district (ED) 224, p. 78B, dwelling 25, family 58, Maxwell, William H., Fanny C., Bagwell, Annie E.; digital images, Ancestry (accessed 12 May 2014); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 855. Cit. Date: 12 May 2014.
10. “SUICIDE OR ACCIDENT,” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 28 Jun 1883, p. 3, col. 3; digital images (bklyn.newspapers.com : accessed 30 Oct 2015).
11. “New York Death Records,” database(accessed 30 Oct 2015), Certificate #7332, William Maxwell, died 10 Jul 1883, age 43, buried Green-Wood.
12. “IT PROVED FATAL,” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 10 Jul 1883, p. 4, col. 3; digital images (bklyn.newspapers.com : accessed 30 Oct 2015).
13. “WILLIAM H. MAXWELL’S DEATH,” The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 11 Jul 1883, p. 4, col. 8; (bklyn.newspapers.com: accessed 30 Oct 2015).
14. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 30 Oct 2015), Certificate #7332, William Maxwell, died 10 Jul 1883, age 43, buried Green-Wood.
15. “New York, New York, Marriage Indexes 1866-1937,” database (accessed 13 May 2014), Fannie Maxwell to Richard H. Maddern, 29 Jun 1885, Kings, Cert #1990. Cit. Date: 13 May 2014.
16. “New York Death Records,” database(accessed 30 Oct 2015), Certificate 8372, Richard Henry Madder, b. 18 Dec 1839, d. 24 Dec 1917, parents Richard Maddern, Grace Thomas, buried 27 Dec 1917 Woodlawn.
17. Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934
18. “MADDERN. – Richard H. Maddern,” The Drama Mirror, 4 Jan 1917, p. 28, col. 4;
19. “New York Death Records,” database (accessed 30 Oct 2015), Certificate 8372, Richard Henry Madder, b. 18 Dec 1839, d. 24 Dec 1917, parents Richard Maddern, Grace Thomas, buried 27 Dec 1917 Woodlawn.
20. New York City of New York death certificate 1177 (1918), Fanny C. Maddern, 11 Feb 1918. Cit. Date: 26 Jun 2014.
21. “MADDERN.–” The New York Tribune, 12 Feb 1918, p. 13, col. 7;

Abraham Walker (1823-1884) and Ann Orme (1820-1909)

Abraham and Ann (Orme) Walker are our immigrant ancestors; although, I’m not sure most of us consider the English to be immigrants in the same way as our Irish or German ancestors. The English are simply easier to research once you have a starting point. For this family, that came about thanks to his family providing the location of Ashton-Under-Line [sic] in his obituary. With the location came church records, which clarified his parents and siblings. However, with a common name such as Walker, the research is by nature slow and painstaking as there are boatloads of Walkers in Lancashire, and all of them seem to bear the same names. I think of Abraham and Ann as the spinners, since that was their occupation in the cotton and woolen mills.

Abraham Walker was born about 1823 in Ashton-Under-Lyne, Lancashire, England. He was the oldest of the six known children of Jeremiah Walker (1799-1850) and Mary Newton (1799-1849) and was baptized on 18 May 1823 in Saint Michaels in Ashton-Under-Lyne. No actual birth date was provided in the baptismal record or yet been located.1

Based on census and church records, the Walker family all appeared to have worked as wool and cotton spinners in the local mills. Their records show “Charlestown” as their home, making them distinguishable from the multitude of other Walkers.

On 8 Nov 1841, Abraham married Ann Orme in Oldham, Lancashire, England.2 The date was found in a pension file, but locating the church record was more difficult. A bishop’s transcript was eventually found, for Abraham Walker (son of Jeremiah) and Ann Hill (daughter) of Ralph. It appears to have been a transcription error on the bishop’s copy. The original church register has not yet been reviewed.

Ann Orme was born 13 Mar 1820 in Ashton-Under-Lyne. She was one of the seven known children of Ralph Orme (1791-) and Phoebe Walker (1788-) and was baptized on 11 May 1823 in Saint Michaels.3 Her family also worked in the local mills as weavers. It is not yet clear if Ann’s mother Phoebe was part of Abraham’s father’s immediate family.

Abraham and Ann had their first known child in January 1844 in Ashton-Under-Lyne. Phoebe Walker was baptized 30 Jan 1844 in Saint Michaels. She died that same year and was buried on 4 Aug 1844 in the churchyard of Saint Michaels.4,5

Between 1845 – 1848, Abraham and Ann left Ashton-Under-Lyne and moved to Philadelphia. He was one of hundreds of wool and cotton mill workers who came to the United States to work in the newly industrialized woolen mills in Philadelphia and Camden. Their next known child, Jeremiah, was baptized on 10 Jul 1848 in the Church of the Redemption (Spring Garden).6 Abraham and Ann appear together without children on the 1850 Federal Census in Spring Garden Ward 7; baby Jeremiah was found on the 1850 Mortality Census as having died in April.7,8 The child found on the mortality census is listed a 3/12, so it’s unclear if this is a second son named Jeremiah or an error where the years were left off in front of his birth. His burial location is not known.

The only known picture of Abraham Walker. ca. 1861

The only known picture of Abraham Walker. ca. 1861

On 5 Aug 1861, Abraham enlisted in Battery H, 1st Reg, PA Light Artillery.9 However, it does not appear that he remained in service. While his service is listed in his obituary, and was known to his descendants, when Ann applied for a Widow’s Pension, she was denied on the grounds that Abraham had been classified as a deserter.10 The family story passed down was that Abraham had become ill and was discharged; however, there is nothing in the military records to support that story.

Abraham continued to work in the wool mills and Ann remained at home raising their children. Abraham’s two brothers, John and Jeremiah, also immigrated to Philadelphia and worked in the mills, either living with him or nearby at various times. Numerous documents and directories place Abraham and Ann in the Spring Garden area of Philadelphia throughout their years in Philadelphia. Abraham was residing at 2204 Hamilton Street, prior to and at the time of his death.11,12

Abraham died on 5 Oct 1884 from cancer of the stomach and was buried on 8 Oct 1884 in Mount Moriah Cemetery.13 His obituary stated he was a member of the International Order of Odd Fellows and the Order of Chosen Friends.14

Ann (Orme) Walker at the ground breaking for her church.

Ann (Orme) Walker at the ground breaking for her church.

Ann survived him by twenty-five years, remaining in the Spring Garden area. On the 1900 census, she is living at 2222 Hamilton Street along with her daughter-in-law Kate, the widow of Ann’s son Ralph.15 Prior to Ann’s death, 24 Oct 1909, she was living with her daughter Mary Elizabeth (Walker) Booth at 2239 Callowhill Street. Ann was laid to rest in Mount Moriah Cemetery with Abraham on 27 Oct 1909.16 Her obituary states that she was a member of the Emmanuel Church at 23d and Summer streets.17

While the record from the Oliver Bair Funeral Home states there was at least a headstone for Abraham “Reopen Abraham Walker… removing stone by family”,18 a stone has not yet been located in the plot for either Abraham, Ann, or the other family members known to be buried there. Oddly enough, Abraham is found on several lists (probably copied repeatedly from others) as a veteran in the cemetery with the following information: Walker, Abraham, d. 10/05/1884, CO H 1 PA L ARTY. This would be how the information on a military tombstone would appear. There is also a record of interment from Mount Moriah to the Quartermaster General stating a headstone was ordered in 1888. It is possible that this is the record, which has generated the information for those lists. It does not mean a military headstone was ever supplied.

Abraham and Ann had eight known children together – they are listed here and will be discussed in the next post:
Phoebe Walker (Jan 1844-Aug 1844) Ashton-Under-Lyne, St Michael’s Cemetery
Jeremiah Walker (11 Jan 1848-Apr 1849) Philadelphia, burial location unknown
Ralph Orme Walker (26 Oct 1850-13 Dec 1897) Philadelphia, Mount Moriah Cemetery
Mary Elizabeth (Walker) Booth (19 Jan 1853-27 Feb 1938) Philadelphia, Mount Moriah Cemetery
Abraham Walker (13 Jan 1854-9 Jul 1920) died in Pittsburgh, South Side Cemetery
John Walker (21 Jun 1858-aft 1880) unknown death/burial
William Zed Walker (2 Aug 1860-10 Apr 1941) Philadelphia, Greenmount Cemetery
Phoebe Ann Lincoln Walker (28 Jul 1865-aft 1880) I have been unable to locate a marriage or death record for Annie.

Abraham and Ann also raised his brother John’s son, Charles, after the death of John and his wife Mary. Charles (22 Jan 1863-24 Jun 1880) was baptized as Abraham and Ann’s own in the Church of the Redemption in 1865 and they listed him as their son on the 1880 census, leading many to believe he was actually their child.19 However, Charles’s death certificate clearly lists John and Mary Walker as his parents.20 Charles is also interred with Abraham and Ann at Mount Moriah.



Footnotes:
1. St Michaels (Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England), “Bishops Transcription of St Michael’s Church,” Baptismal Record; FHL microfilm 547,829
2. Pension Application Ann Walker; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Application; U. S. National Archives & Records Administration, Washington.
3. St Michaels (Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England), “St. Michael’s Church,” Baptisms p.218; FHL microfilm 547,823.
4. St Michaels (Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England), “Baptisms,” p.24, 30 Jan 1844, Phoebe Walker dau. of Abraham & Ann Walker; FHL microfilm 1,538,434.
5. St Michaels (Ashton Under Lyne, Lancashire, England), “Burials,” p. 246, line 2, Phoebe dau. of Abraham Walker, 4 Aug 1844; FHL microfilm 1,550,971.
6. Church of the Redemption (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia County), “Church of the Redemption (Spring Garden),” Records 1846-1850 by Rev. George A. Duborow; FHL microfilm 2,048,314, item Baptism Jeremiah Walker 11 Jan 1848.
7. 1850 U.S. census, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Philadelphia, p. 382, dwelling 249, family 327, Abraham Walker; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 819.
8. Pennsylvania U.S. Census Bureau, Mortality Schedule, M1838, 11 rolls: pg 2 Seventh Precinct, Spring Garden, Philadelphia, 25, Jeremiah Walker, aged 3/12, cause of death unknown; digital image, The Generations Network, Inc., “U. S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules, 1850-1880,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: 24 Nov 2009).
9. National Park Service. U.S. Civil War Soldiers, 1861-1865 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007.
10. Adjutant General Statement; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Application; U. S. National Archives & Records Administration, Washington. Pension File of Ann Walker, Widow of Abraham Batt H, 1st Ref., PA Lt Art
11. 1870 U.S. census, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Philadelphia, p. 25, dwelling 321, family 364, Abram Walker; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M593, roll 1400.
12. 1880 U.S. census, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Philadelphia, enumeration district (ED) 276, p. 367 Stamped, dwelling 114, family 147; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T9, roll 1175.
13. Pennsylvania City of Philadelphia, Philadelphia City Death Certificates 1803-1915, Abram Walker; digital image, Family Search, “Pennsylvania, Philadelphia City Death Records 1803-1915,” New Family Search (http://pilot.familysearch.org: 20 Jun 2008).
14. Obituary, “Walker,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, 8 Oct 1884, p5; digital images.
15. 1900 U.S. census, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Philadelphia, enumeration district (ED) 285, p. 8B, dwelling 119; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 1458.
16. Pennsylvania Department of Health, death certificate 23909 (1909), Ann Walker; Department of Vital Statistics, New Castle.
17. Obituary, “Walker,” The Philadelphia Inquirer, 26 Oct 1909, p7; digital images.
18. Historical Society of Pennsylvania; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Collection Name: Historic Pennsylvania Church and Town Records

Peter B. McLean, 1st Lt, Co H, 87th NY Inf – 4

The Civil War & its cost –
Part 4 – Peter B.’s Bitter End 1890-1895

By the end of 1890, Peter B. McLean was crippled by rheumatism and still struggling with the malarial fevers that had plagued him throughout his post war years. His pension made it possible for him to turn his business over to his sons, and I like to believe that life became a little easier for a short time. However, it appears that any relief and peace may have been short-lived.

Sister-in-law Ruth Reed stated, “Mr. McLean was totally disabled from labor last 5 years of his life. … I noticed evidence of insanity a year or two before he was sent to the Asylum. He used to think his children were all in hell and he was trying to get them out. He talked at random. I knew of no cause for this. He had no financial or family trouble or religious trouble to my knowledge. For 5 or so years before he died he used to say that his head bothered him and that he couldn’t sleep nights.”

According to his wife Susan, Peter B. came down with a case of “la grippe” in January 1893. Grippe was a common name in its time for influenza. She stated in her deposition that this bout of illness “left him very weak and nervous. Could not sleep and as a result his mind gave way… Every time he was sick it would seem to affect his head.”

From Daniel Harrison’s deposition: “For several years prior to his death, he lost so much sleep from pain that his mind became affected and a commission was appointed to inquire into his sanity.”

In June of 1893, a panel of doctors was assembled to examine Peter B., and they recommended his commitment to the asylum at Middletown, New York. The records of his examination are not part of his pension file as they were medical records that went to the hospital with him. He was committed to The Middletown State Homeopathic Hospital on 1 Jul 1893.
middletown2

Peter B. remained in the asylum for the rest of his life and died there 1 Oct 1895. His death certificate stated the primary cause was chronic melancholia and the secondary cause a pulmonary hemorrhage.

Only after his death is the reality of his final years brought to light. When his wife applied for a widow’s pension shortly after his death, the hospital was contacted for a statement about his death. The pension board was attempting to determine if his death was related to his military service. The following letter dated 4 Feb 1896 was received:

“Sir:-
Your communication under date of Jan. 31, 1896 regarding the late Peter B. McLean, has been received, and in reply I would state:
On admission to this hospital he was in a feeble physical condition, rapidly losing flesh; weighed on admission 144 lbs. and a month later 109 lbs.; was very restless, suspicious, careless in his habits, destructive and inclined to suicide, having the delusion that he was being persecuted by the devil, did not care to talk, would admit of no pain but manner very nervous. The remote cause of his sickness were supposed to be predisposition (nervous), and exciting physical disease. The physical disease referred to, was an attack of grip he had had in January 1892. In his history it was stated that “he was ill with typhoid fever in the army in 1862. After convalescence his mind was not right for six months.” It is probable that phthisis was developed before admission to this hospital.
Very truly yours,
C. Spencer Kinney”

According to my Merriam-Webster, phthsis is a wasting or consumptive condition such as pulmonary tuberculosis. This explains the secondary cause of death.

It was a painful and ugly ending for a good man.

Peter B. McLean, 1st Lt, Co H, 87th NY Inf – 3

The Civil War & its cost –
Part 3 – 25 Hard Years 1865-1890.

In 1865, Peter B. had recovered sufficiently enough to return to work and to his own home. He once again appears in the Brooklyn city directories as a painter and grainer. His fourth child Peter was born this year, and many more followed in the coming years. On 21 Feb 1872, Peter B.’s father Peter Charles McLean died. He had spent the last three years in Peter B.’s home after a stroke left him paralyzed and unable to care for himself. Peter B. sold his property in Brooklyn and relocated to Roslyn in Queens County that same year. He remained there until 1893 when his physical and mental state deteriorated to the point that he had to be committed.

It is clear from the depositions of his doctor, his wife, associates, and neighbors that he was not the man he’d been before the illnesses acquired during the war ravaged him. As shown in the previous post, Dr. William H. Hanford stated that Peter B. continued to suffer from Malaria and had developed rheumatism. In almost every deposition provided by people who knew him both before and after the war, the deponents uniformly commented on the change in his appearance. A variety of words and phrases conveyed the picture: sallow, pale, gaunt, loss of flesh, tired, in pain, and suffering.

27 Apr 1898, former private George W. Bagwell stated, “The next time I saw him was in 1864, he then looked thin, delicate and was not at all well. … I did not again see him until about 1889 when I met him in Long Island City, L.I. … In appearance he looked about the same as when I saw him in 1864.” Former Captain William H. Leaycraft recalled seeing Peter B. a short time after his own discharge in 1863, but couldn’t recall the exact date. “He then looked pale and emaciated and in poor health.” Alfred Noon met Peter B. when he moved to Roslyn in 1872 and worked with him for almost 20 years. He provided the following: [Read more…]

Peter B. McLean, 1st Lt, Co H, 87th NY Inf – 2

The Civil War & its cost –
Part 2 – Three Rough Years.

Once Peter B. McLean had been removed from the hospital tent near Yorktown, his long journey home had just begun. Affidavits and depositions found in his pension file and in his wife Susan’s application for a widow’s pension provide the details of the experience.

In a 29 Jan 1890 declaration, Peter B. wrote of his departure from Yorktown and return home. I have provided a transcript (with clarifications) below the image.
peterbstate1
“Was taken from Hospital tent before [on the lines in front of] Yorktown about May 5th 1862 to Fort Monroe in wagon & boat to Baltimore & cars [train] enroute home while suffering with fever & became deranged & out of head and was put in Soldiers Home at Philadelphia. They sent for my wife. I remained in Philadelphia that one week & then taken to my father’s house 125 Grand St Brooklyn L.I. [Long Island] Dr. Hanford was sent for. I remained there to the fall about October then was removed to my own home 275 Graham Ave. Was confined to the house till May 1863 confined to house a whole year & gained strength enough to go out & do light work in fall of 1863 had a relapse & was sick again 1864 a whole year until Spring 1865. & have Rheumatism & diarrhea ever since.” The last line in the paragraph is about his ruptures (hernias in the groin) and that he is unable to do any manual labor.

Dr. William H. Hanford, mentioned above, was the McLean family physician. On 14 Mar 1890, he provided an affidavit stating that he had been Peter B.’s physician before the war and [Read more…]

Peter B. McLean, 1st Lt, Co H, 87th NY Inf – 1

The Civil War & its cost –
Part 1 – 8 short months.

Peter B.’s service in the Civil War was short, but like many others of his generation, the war had a lasting effect on him. He enrolled in the Union Army in Brooklyn, New York, on 5 Oct 1861. On 1 Nov, he mustered in and was commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant in Company H, of the New York 87th Infantry Regiment, known as the Brooklyn Rifles.1 Peter B. was 29-years-old and married with three small children at home. He was a house and sign painter by trade with a thriving business in Williamsburg. By all accounts, he was a healthy, sound, young man upon entry in the service. Eight months later, ravaged by typhoid, malaria, and dysentery, he was too ill to continue. On 4 May 1862, he resigned his commission and mustered out of the service.

While there is not a great deal of information about the 87th NY on the Internet, I’ve been able to combine what I found in the depositions in the pension files for him and his wife, to create a timeline for his activities and the field conditions while he was in service.

The mustering process for the 87th lasted from October to December in 1861.2 The New York Times for Monday, 2 Dec 1861, documented its departure for Washington DC.

THE BROOKLYN RIFLES.– This regiment, numbered Eighty-seven, of the State Volunteers, commanded by Colonel STEPHEN A. DODGE, and quartered at the Palace Garden, New-York, will reach this city Monday morning, and form on Remsen-street at 11 o’clock, where the city authorities will present the corps with a stand of colors. This regiment is mainly composed of residents of Brooklyn.

87thInfRegColor2007.0173
The regiment was attached to the 3rd Brigade, Casey’s Division, in the Army of the Potomac. They were encamped on Meridian Hill3 and performed duties in Washington DC until early March. From 10-15 March, the 87th New York under the command of Col Stephen A. Dodge advanced on Manassas, Virginia. The regiment was attached to 1st Brigade (Col Charles D. Jameson), 3rd Division (BG Charles Smith Hamilton), III Army Corps (BG Samuel P. Heintzelman), Army of the Potomac (MG George B. McClellan).

Peter B. appeared to be both respected and liked by his men as many stated so in their depositions to the pension bureau examiner. In an 1898 deposition to a special examiner from the U.S. Bureau of Pensions, former Private Phillip Hart made it a point to tell the examiner how he felt about 1st Lt McLean. “Mr. McLean was an excellent officer; there were none better. Was a gentleman in every way.”4

On 17 March, the regiment was ordered to the peninsula of Virginia, where on 5 April 1862, the Siege of Yorktown began.5

Peter was in Heintzelman's command and encamped in the swampy area near Wormley's Creek.  (Map courtesy of Wikipedia)

Peter was in Heintzelman’s command and encamped in the swampy area near Wormley’s Creek. (Map courtesy of Wikipedia)

An excellent summary of Yorktown in the Civil War can be found on the National Park Service site.

The regimental history documents a skirmish on 11 Apr 1862.6 Private Edward McIntyre recalled in an 1898 affidavit that while on the march in the Peninsula Campaign Lt McLean “was injured by the bursting of a shell in close proximity to himself; he was so shocked as to be deprived of his speech for some time and in my opinion he never recovered from its shock – he appeared very nervous after and was not the same man.” 7 Private Phillip Hart corroborated this in his deposition. “…I remember that his voice was very weak and that he did not drill us as well as formerly. Was delicate looking and his voice was husky as if he had some trouble in his throat.” 8

Sickness and disease were common in the camps and accounted for far more casualties than enemy fire. Company D Commander William H. Leaycraft stated, “I remember that while we were in front of Yorktown many of our men were sick with typhoid and malarial fevers and also diarrhea.”9 Private McIntyre also recalled the conditions. “I was at Yorktown in April 1862, and many of our men were sick at that time. This was on account of the location of our camp, which was near a swamp. Many had dysentery and malaria horrible.”10

In his 1890 application for an invalid pension, Peter B. stated that he was taken from the hospital tent in front of Yorktown, “…to Fort Monroe in wagon & boat to Baltimore & cars enroute home.”11

Private Samuel Patterson recalled, “I was present and saw Lieutenant McLean come in very sick with diarrhea & a high fever & saw him taken to the hospital tent while we was in front of Yorktown it was in the latter part of April 1862 and left him there when the army moved on.”12 Private Timothy Hays stated that it was “on or about 26 April 1862… he was taken sick with malaria fever and chronic diarrhea, and sent to hospital tent at Yorktown, where we left him when we moved forward. … I knew from my own personal knowledge that he was confined to his bed in the hospital with malaria fever and chronic diarrhea.”13 George J. Holman, a hospital steward for the regiment confirmed that Peter B. was indeed in the hospital and then evacuated to Fort Monroe.14

On 4 May 1862, Peter B. resigned his commission due to illness, and the Siege of Yorktown ended. But for Peter B., a personal war to survive and regain his health had just begun.



1. Annual Report of the Adjutant-General of the State of New York for the Year 1893: Registers of the 87th NY Infantry Regiment.
2. New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History; Last modified: August 19, 2010; URL: http://www.dmna.state.ny.us/historic/reghist/civil/infantry/87thInf/87thInfMain.htm
3. ibid.
4. Phillip Hart, Deposition C, 25 Mar 1898, Widow’s Pension: Susan W. McLean, p17; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 13 May 2014.
5. New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs: Military History; Last modified: August 19, 2010;see 4 above.
6. Civil War in the East; URL: http://www.civilwarintheeast.com/USA/NY/NY087.php
7. Edward McIntyre, Deposition F, 5 Feb 1898; Widow’s Pension: Susan W. McLean, p23; see 4 above.
8. Phillip Hart, Deposition C, 25 Mar 1898, Widow’s Pension: Susan W. McLean, p18; see 4 above.
9. William H. Leaycraft, Deposition D, 17 May 1898, Widow’s Pension: Susan W. McLean, p19; see 4 above.
10. Edward McIntyre, Deposition F, 5 Feb 1898; Widow’s Pension: Susan W. McLean, p23; see 4 above.
11. Invalid Application, 2 Jul 1890, Peter B. McLean; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 13 May 2014.
12. Samuel Patterson, Deposition, 24 Apr 1890, Invalid File: Peter B. McLean; see 11 above.
13. Timothy Hays, Deposition, 8 Oct 1890, Invalid File: Peter B. McLean; see 11 above.
14. George J. Holman, Affidavit, 9 May 1890, Invalid File: Peter B. McLean; see 11 above.

Peter Byron McLean (1832-1895)

Peter Byron McLean was born 21 Jul 1832 in New York City, New York,1 the second known child of Peter Charles McLean (1805-1872) and Margaret Swasey (abt 1806-1854). He relocated to Williamsburg in Brooklyn with his parents in about 1842. He was enumerated there with his father and siblings in 1850 and then again on the June 1855 New York State Census.2,3 In researching Peter Byron, I refer to him as Peter B. to distinguish him from his father Peter C. While I have many documents for Peter B., I have not yet located a photo of him. His physical description from his pension file states he was 5’8″, 145 lbs., light complexion, brown hair, and blue eyes.

Peter B. married Susan Winn Frith on 27 Aug 1856, at St. Mark’s Protestant Episcopal Church, in Williamsburg.4 Susan (24 Jun 1839-21 May 1915) was the daughter of William Frith (1807-1855) and Frances Brown (1815-1854).

Marriage Certificate provided in 1895 by Susan as proof of marriage.

Marriage Certificate provided in 1895 by Susan as proof of marriage.


Like his father and brothers, Peter B. was a house, sign, and fresco painter as well as a stainer and grainer. A grainer was a painter who could stain and change the colors of wood with both paints and varnishes. He worked first with his father and then opened his own business.

On 5 Oct 1861, Peter B. joined the Union Army. On 1 November he was commissioned as a 1st Lieutenant in Company H, 87th New York Infantry Regiment. He was mustered out on 4 May 1862 after contracting typhoid fever and malaria during the Siege of Yorktown in early 1862.5 A separate series of posts about Peter B.’s civil war service and information from his pension file will follow this post.

After his return from the Civil War, Peter B. and his family were dependent on his father’s assistance until he was able to resume his career as a painter almost three years later. By 1870, Peter B. had his business at 156 Grand in Williamsburg, near the businesses of his father and his brother Washington.6

After the death of his father in 1872, Peter B. relocated his family to Roslyn in Queens County. He filed for his Civil War Invalid pension and was granted disability on 29 Jan 1890, although he continued to operate his business until 1893.7
Peter Adv Card

Upon suffering a mental breakdown, he was committed to the insane asylum at the State Homeopathic Hospital at Middletown on 1 Jul 1893.8
middletown2
He died 1 Oct 1915 at Middletown, Orange, New York.9 A copy of his death certificate was found in his Civil War pension file and states his cause of death as chronic melancholia consecutive with pulmonary hemorrhage. He was buried in Roslyn Cemetery.

Died. Peter B. McLean, an old resident of Roslyn, died in Middletown, N.Y., last Tuesday, age 61 years. He was a war veteran, having served in the Eighty-seventh New York volunteers. He was a member of Mansfield post G.A.R. of Brooklyn. Funeral services were held in the Methodist Episcopal Church of Roslyn and the interment was in Roslyn cemetery. Elijah Ward post G.A.R. furnished the pall bearers, and the members of the Roslyn Benevolent society, of which the deceased was a member, also attended in a body and performed the last burial services at the grave.10

Peter B. McLean

Susan survived her husband by ten years and will be discussed in a separate post. According to her widow’s pension file, she and Peter B. had twelve children together. Eight are known by name, one burial for a stillborn has been found, but the other three have not yet been located. It is possible they were interred in Union Cemetery in Brooklyn. There are no extant records for this cemetery.

1. Franklin Byron McLean, born 6 Nov 1857, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, died 10 Oct 1925, Hempstead, Nassau, New York, buried 19 Oct 1925, Greenfield Cemetery in Uniondale. On 26 Sep 1887, he married Martha (Mattie) Elizabeth Wetterau, born Jan 1867, died 28 Nov 1949. They had three children: Emma McLean, Francis Byron McLean, and Jennette (Jane) McLean. All but Francis Byron are interred together in Greenfield Cemetery. Francis Byron is in the Cemetery of the Holy Rood.
2. Washington McLean, born Feb 1859 and died 24 Feb 1861 of convulsions in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He was interred in Union Cemetery.
3. Sarah R. McLean, born 28 Mar 1861 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York, died 21 May 1948 in Floral Park, Nassau, New York, buried Roslyn Cemetery. In about 1883, she married Wallace Thurston, born Oct 1863, died 9 Dec 1941. They had five known children: Wallace Bruce Thurston, Edward McLean Thurston, Henry Thurston, Albert McLean Thurston, and Byron McLean Thurston. All are interred in Roslyn Cemetery.
4. Charles Wallace McLean, born 30 Dec 1863, died from diphtheria 24 Jun 1867 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He was interred in Union Cemetery.
5. Peter McLean, born 1865 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He is not found on the 1880 Census or in any documents after 1870.
6. George Edward McLean – previously discussed.
7. Matthew Taylor McLean, born 7 Sep 1869 and died 21 Jul 1871 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Kings, New York. He was interred in Union Cemetery.
8. Unknown McLean, born circa 1872, died before 1878, probably interred in Union Cemetery. Probable stillborn as no death certificate on file.
9. Unknown McLean, born circa 1874, died before 1878, probably interred in Union Cemetery. Probable stillborn as no death certificate on file.
10. Stillborn McLean, born circa 1876, probably interred in Union Cemetery. Probable stillborn as no death certificate on file.
11. Stillborn McLean, born and died 1878, interred Roslyn Cemetery. This is the unnamed McLean baby interred in the family plot when it was purchased in 1878.
12. Virginia Stuart McLean, born 17 May 1881 and died 10 May 1896 of malaria in Roslyn, Queens, New York. She was interred in Roslyn Cemetery.



1. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Application #751962; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
2. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Application #751962; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
3. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn Ward 14, Kings, New York, p. E.D. 2, dwelling 832, line 6, P.C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 10 May 2014). Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
4. 1855, New York, population schedule, Brooklyn Ward 14, Kings, New York, p. E.D. 2, dwelling 832, line 6, P.C. McLean; digital images, Ancestry(accessed 10 May 2014). Cit. Date: 10 May 2014.
5. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Civil ar and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
6. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Civil ar and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
7. Declaration For A Disability Pension filed by Peter B. McLean; Application #751962; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
8. Declaration For A Widow’s Pension filed by Susan W. McLean 1905; Application #622894; Civil War and Later Complete File (NATF 85D); Federal Military Pension Applications; National Archives and Records Administration. Cit. Date: 20 Dec 2008.
9. New York death certificate (1915), Peter B. McLean, died 1 Oct 1895, Middletown, Orange, New York, Melancholia Chronic, Pulmonary hemorhage. Cit. Date: 11 May 2014.
10. “Obituary – Peter B. McLean,” Brooklyn Daily Eagle, 5 Oct 1895, p. 7 c.6; digital images. Cit. Date: 27 Apr 2014.

Finding Zachariah T. Scott

I was in the process of doing a random search on Margaret’s father, Daniel Olinger, when my spelling accident occurred. I typed in “’Daniel Ohlinger’ Armstrong Co. PA” and hit enter for my Google search. As soon as I did it, I realized that I had misspelled Olinger and was ready to start over when a single item came up in the results. The word “GASTOWN” in the description caught my eye. Gastown is less than three miles from Elderton and many of the Olingers are buried in the small cemetery there. The entry was a transcription of records for the Reformed and Lutheran Churches in Gastown with baptismal entries from 24 September 1840 through 26 January 1889. I was pretty excited about the record as it might document the birth or baptism of Margaret who was born in 1842, so I began to skim the pages looking for Olinger/Ohlinger. The pages had been translated from the original German, so I expected some spelling variations and possibly even different names based on the German version. I did not find a record for Margaret, but what I did find on page 3 of the transcript was a baptism record that stunned me:

Zacharia b. 2 Dec. 1842, Bapt. 16 Sept. 1844,
Parents: Polly Anthony,
Declared Father: James Scott,
Sponsor: John Anthony
1

Could it be as simple as an illegitimate child? The birth date was only a day off from his tombstone and the date listed on his death record. But how many children named Zachariah could have been born in the opening days of December 1842 in the Elderton/Gastown area? More importantly, how many Zachariahs could there be with a declared father named Scott?

According to the index, this was the only Scott listed in the record, but I still went through every page and looked at every name. I marked all the Anthonys and found that John A. Anthony and his wife Phebia had two children baptized in the church in 1848 and 1849 respectively. Based on their ages, it is probable that John was a brother or a cousin to Polly. These were the only baptismal records with the surname of Anthony.

On Ancestry, I did an advanced search for Zachariah, born 1842, Armstrong, Pennsylvania, with a mother named Polly. I was rewarded with Zachariah and Polly Smail on the 1850 census in Plumcreek Township. This was the same family I had looked at previously, but now the possibility that my Zachariah Scott and this Zachariah Smail could be one and the same, had “legs.” The household consisted of:

George Smail, age 25, a farmer born in PA
Polly, age 28, PA
Zachariah, age 10, PA, attending school
Elisa Jane, age 2
Canann, age 6 mo. Female
2

The 1860 census placed the family in Cowanshannock Township, which abuts the northern end of Plumcreek Township. The family now consisted of:

George Smail, age 40
Mary, 26
Zacharias, 17
Eliza J., 15
Catharine A., 9
Margaret, 8
James, 5
Mary, 4
Sarah, 3
3

Back in the church records I looked for Smails and quickly found them under the German spelling of Schmehl. There was a baptismal record on page 5 for Elisa Jane, born 27 July 1848, baptized 16 October 1848, parents George Schmehl and wife Polly. This entry is a mere dozen entries below the entry of John A. and Phebia Anthony’s first child, Elisabeth Anna. Catharine’s 11 December 1849 birth and 4 May 1851 baptism are recorded on page 7 with the parents listed as George Schmehl and wife Maria. Since Polly is a pet name for Mary, I had no trouble accepting that this was the same woman using the more mature name of Mary in the census records and being referred to as Maria in the German church record.

I spent the next couple of weeks trying every search method that I could think of to locate records for Zachariah Smail after 1860, but it seems that Zachariah Smail disappeared at the same time Zachariah Scott appeared. I have not found Zachariah Smail on any census record, burial, or cemetery record, nor did he enlist in the military or die in the Civil War. There are no tax or draft records for him in the appropriate places or times. I conducted the same searches for Zachariah Anthony – he does not exist beyond the church record of his baptism.



1. Gastown Reformed and Lutheran Churches (Gastown, Pennsylvania, Armstrong County), Combined Church Records, “Church Book of the Reformed and Lutheran Churches of Plumcreek,” Baptism Zachariah Scott p3; digital images, Candy McCain, U S. GenWeb (http://files.usgwarchives.org/pa/armstrong/church : accessed 10 Jul 2008).
2. 1850 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Plumcreek Twp, p. 354, dwelling 291, family 291, Zachariah Smail; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M432, roll 749.
3. 1860 U.S. census, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Cowanshannock, p. 124, dwelling 1325, family 1325, Zachariah Smail; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.Ancestry.com); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm M653, roll 1069.

The Kortlever Children

Cornelis born 16 April 1873 in Leerdam, Zuid, Netherlands.1 The only documentation of Cornelis after his birth record on Genlias is the passenger list previously shown. I believe he died previous to the 1885 Iowa State Census because his name is recycled to Baby Cornelis born about 1884.

Maria Mary, 17 October 1874–16 April 1926, married John Burgraff . Mary and her 10 children were previously discussed.

Hugo 18 January 1876–16 Jun 1955.2,3 Hugo was born in Leerdam and immigrated with his mother in 1882. He married Martha Roo (21 July 1883–22 July 1974)4 on 22 September 1903 in Lynden, Whatcom County, Washington.5 They had five children: John H., Raymond B., Carl M., Marshall F., and Victor E. He appears to be close to his sister Mary since she requests he be named guardian of her minor children in her will. Hugo and Martha are buried in Monumenta Cemetery in Lynden.

Maaike 3 September 1877-21 October 1877, Leerdam.6

Bastiaan Cornelis born 30 December 1878 in Leerdam.7 He immigrated with his mother in 1882 and is last recorded on the 1885 Iowa census. I believe he may have died in Iowa before 1895 as I find not found any further record of him.

John Cornelis 6 June 1882–September 1969.8,9 I found no birth record for John on Genlias. It is possible that he was born in Belgium while his mother was waiting for the ship. His World War I Draft Record states his father John Kortlever of Lynden, Washington, is his point of contact. According to an un-sourced family group sheet, John married Mae Agnes Wilcox and died in Long Beach, California.

Cornelis born about 1884 in Alton, Sioux County, Iowa. The only record of Baby Cornelis is the 1885 Iowa State Census. I have found no other records.

Maaike 1 May 1885–18 June 1956. Maggie was born in Iowa and on 25 April 190410 she married Herman Pen (24 January 1875–30 December 1949)11 in Lynden. Maggie and Herman had 11 children: Frank, Johan (John), Jacob, Jennie, Florence, Hugo, Josephine, Dick, John, Marshall, and Cornelius. Herman and Maggie are buried in Monumenta Cemetery.

Cornelia 3 May 1890–13 June 1955.12 Nellie was born in Iowa and on 30 January 191213 she married Rendit Van Diest (5 February 1885-2 June 1959)14 in Lynden. They had 5 children: Cornelius, John B., Gerrit H., Margaret F., and Trenton. Ren and Nellie are buried in Monumenta Cemetery.

Jennie 15 October 1892-23 October 1920.15 Jennie was also born in Iowa and on 20 January 191816 she married Abraham Noteboom (30 January 1883–25 Nov 1970)17 in Lynden. They had one child: Cornelius. Jennie and Abraham are buried in Monumenta Cemetery.



1. Genlias database, Genlias (http://www.genlias.nl/en : accessed 10 Feb 2010), Cornelis Kortleever, 16 Apr 1873, Kedichem; Nationaal Archief (Rijksarchief Zuid-Holland).
2. Genlias database, Genlias (http://www.genlias.nl/en : accessed 10 Feb 2010), Hugo Kortleever, 19 Jan 1876, Kedichem; Nationaal Archief (Rijksarchief Zuid-Holland).
3. Whatcom County, Washington, death certificate no. 12360 (16 Jun 1955), Hugo Kortlever; Washington State Vital Records, Olympia, Washington.
4. Washington State Deparatment of Health, “Washington Death Index, 1940-1996,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Feb 2010), Martha Kortlever, 23 Jul 1974, Cert #017155.
5. Whatcom County, Washington, Marriage Licenses, 1753, Hugo Kortlever-Martha Roo, 22 Sep 1903; Whatcom County Marriage Records, Bellingham.
6. Genlias database, Genlias (http://www.genlias.nl/en : accessed 11 Aug 2009), Birth, Maaike Kortlever, 3 Sep 1877; Schoonrewoerd, Zuid, Netherlands.
7. Genlias database, Genlias (http://www.genlias.nl/en : accessed 11 Aug 2009), Birth, Bastiaan Cernelis Kortleever, 30 Dec 1878, Leerdam; Nationaal Archief (Rijksarchief Zuid-Holland).
8. “WWI Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Feb 2010), John Cornelis Kortlever, 6 Jun 1882.
9. State of California Dept. of Health Services, “California Death Index, 1940-1997,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Feb 2010), John C. Kortlever, died 11 Sep 1969, Los Angeles.
10. Whatcom County, Washington, Marriage Licenses, Herman Pen-Maggie Kortlever, 25 Apr 1904; Whatcom County Marriage Records, Bellingham, Washington.
11. Whatcom County, Washington, death certificate no. 22307 (30 Dec 1949), Herman Pen; Washington State Vital Records, Olympia, Washington.
12. Whatcom County, Washington, death certificate no. 12357 (13 Jun 1955), Cornelia Van Diest; Washington State Vital Records, Olympia, Washington.
13. Whatcom County, Washington, Marriage Licenses, 748, Rendit Van Diest-Cornelia Kortlever, 30 Jan 1912; Whatcom County Marriage Records, Bellingham, Washington.
14. Whatcom County, Washington, death certificate no. 13179 (2 Jun 1959), Ren Vandiest, age 84; Washington State Vital Records, Olympia, Washington.
15. “Many attend Services for Late Mrs. Abe Noteboom,” (Lynden) Lynden Tribune, 28 Oct 1920.
16. Whatcom County, Washington, Marriage Licenses, 3625, Abram Noteboom-Jennie Kortlever, 10 Jan 1918; Whatcom County Marriage Records, Bellingham.
17. Washington State Deparatment of Health, “Washington Death Index, 1940-1996,” database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 Feb 2010), Abram Noteboom, 25 Nov 1970, Cert.#026911